Renaissance News

CALL FOR PAPERS: The International Christopher Marlowe

A 2-day conference at the University of Exeter
7th – 8th September 2015

Much current and historical scholarship has tended to consider Marlowe’s plays, poems and translations from an English cultural and literary perspective. With one or two exceptions, his connections to the thought and literature of non-English cultures have been less thoroughly explored, even as scholars have begun to examine the highly cosmopolitan, multi-lingual character of English literary production and consumption during the 1580s and 1590s.

To what extent was Marlowe an ‘international’ writer? In what ways did his work absorb, respond to, imitate or challenge literary, dramatic and intellectual trends in France, Spain, Italy, the Holy Roman Empire, the Netherlands, Turkey or further afield? What role, if any, has the reception of his work played in non-English-speaking cultures?

We invite proposals for papers of up to 30 minutes on any aspect of the “international” content or contexts of Marlowe and his work. Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words to E.J.Paleit@exeter.ac.uk or N.Williams@exeter.ac.uk by 14th November 2014. We also welcome any queries at this address.

Organisers: Dr. Edward Paleit, Nora Williams (University of Exeter)

CALL FOR PAPERS: Early Modern Women and the Book: Ownership, Circulation, and Collecting

Proposals are sought for a panel — “Early Modern Women and the Book: Ownership, Circulation, and Collecting” — to be proposed for the annual meeting of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing (SHARP) in Montreal and Longueuil, Quebec, July 6-11, 2015.

We seek proposals for papers that examine early modern British women who owned books, circulated books, or created libraries or book collections between 1500-1700, a period that saw increased literacy and a revolution in book production and circulation. Scholars have reconstructed and assessed the collections and libraries of Renaissance men, including Harvey, Dee, Jonson, Hales, and Drake; women’s book ownership, as a subject of scholarly inquiry, “awaits its historian,” observes David McKitterick (2000) in a study of Elizabeth Puckering’s library. What resources (commonplace books, poetry miscellanies, inventories, etc.) shed light on women’s circulation of books within communities? What are the marks — figurative, material, cultural — of women’s book usage, ownership, and collecting? What can the creation of book collections or libraries tell us about social status, family ties, confessional affiliations, education, economic status, travels? What methodologies illuminate these interrelated topics?

By Oct. 1, 2014, please send a file containing a 350 word abstract and a 50-word biographical statement to Leah Knight (lknight@brocku.ca), Micheline White (micheline.white@carleton.ca), and Elizabeth Sauer (esauer@brocku.ca) for consideration.


Middle Ages in the Modern World (MAMO) 2015

Following the success of MAMO 2013, held at St Andrews last year, we are proud to announce that a follow-up conference will be held from Monday 29 June to Thursday 2 July 2015 at the University of Lincoln. It will also be held in conjunction with Lincoln’s celebrations of the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta, where Lincoln’s own copy of the Magna Carta will have returned and be back proudly on display in the castle.

As the title suggests, MAMO aims to explore the continued return to, and relevance of, the Middle Ages in the modern world, and why the period continues to attract audiences and scholars. Particularly, its interdisciplinary focus is designed to explore a range of areas, from popular culture to public history, from science to advertising, and even legal frameworks and political rhetoric. Given the popularity of medievalism as a growing discipline, and given the fantastic reception of the last conference, we are expecting a wide audience from a range of fields and disciplines including History, Literature, Film & Television, Video Games, Performing Arts, Drama, Languages, Museum Curation and more besides.

Specific themes include, but are by no means limited to:
  • The reception of the Middle Ages in the arts, music, film, politics & popular culture 
  • The significance and relevance of Magna Carta to the modern world 
  • Medievalism and Orientalism 
  • Translating and interpreting medieval texts 
  • Re-enactment and revival 
  • Fantasy and the Middle Ages 
  • Eco-Medievalism and postmodern approaches to medieval studies 
  • The Middle Ages in Film, Television, Comic Books and Graphic Novels 
  • Medievalism and video games 
  • Science and the Middle Ages 
  • The Middle Ages and documentary programming 

In this first round we welcome both proposals for complete panels as well as individual proposals for papers. There’s also a PDF version for download, so please do spread the word to your networks; click here for the Call for Papers poster.

For individual papers, abstracts of 250-300 words should be sent to themamoconference@gmail.com, by 15 September 2014.

We will be keeping all of the details and information up to date through the Facebook group, through the Twitter hashtag #MAMO2015 or on our conference website, located at www.themamo.org. Details of keynotes will be released shortly, and later in the year we will post further information on accommodation, registration and other details. For specific enquiries or details about the conference themes and logistics please contact Andrew Elliott directly on aelliott@lincoln.ac.uk.

Panel proposals should include abstracts, names and contact details of presenters and a short (c. 200 word) description of the panel itself with the organiser’s contact details; these should be sent by Sunday 31 August 2014.

Recent European (Re)translations of Shakespeare

29 June - 2 July 2015, University of Worcester, UK
A seminar at the ESRA conference

Conveners: Lily Kahn (UCL),  l.kahn@ucl.ac.uk
Márta Minier (University of South Wales), marta.minier@southwales.ac.uk
Martin Regal (University of Iceland), martinregal@gmail.com

The longevity of Shakespearean translations is generally somewhat limited. Although some canonical translations have a relatively long life as literary works and/or in the theatre, it is common for Shakespeare to be retranslated periodically. Within Europe there is a widespread phenomenon of systematic series of (re)translations of Shakespeare’s complete works; in recent years this trend has given rise to the WSOY Finnish Complete Works, completed in 2013, the new Polish Complete Works, the New Romanian Shakespeare series, and others. In addition, specially commissioned individual retranslations designed for specific productions are a common feature of the European theatrical scene. Examination of the rich variety of issues surrounding this phenomenon of retranslation in the European context can provide valuable insights into the theory and practice of Shakespearean interpretation.

This proposed seminar will bring together scholars, editors and practising translators engaged in the production and analysis of Shakespearean translations. It will also be open to dramaturges or directors who would like to comment on working with new or revised (that is, dramaturgically adjusted) translations. Proposals will be welcomed on topics including but not limited to the following:

  • factors galvanising the decision to produce new translations, including philological and interpretive shifts, changing conventions of theatre, and the emergence of new performance and directorial styles; 
  • the collaborative framework behind commissioned translations and the relationship between the translator and other stakeholders;
  • societal perceptions of the modern Shakespeare translator; trends in the selection of different translation strategies (e.g. foreignising vs. domesticating);
  • comparisons between alternative translations of the ‘same’ play (both synchronically and diachronically);
  • different translations of a single play by the same translator; the use of updated and otherwise modified versions of existing translations in new productions instead of commissioning completely original work; 
  • the critical reception of new translations both in textual format and in theatrical contexts.

We will consider papers focusing on academic translation series not necessarily intended for performance in addition to those specifically commissioned or designed for theatrical use that may not be as suitable for employment in educational contexts.

Please submit an abstract (200-300 words) and a brief biography (150 words) by 1 December 2014 to all seminar conveners. All participants will be notified about the acceptance of their proposals by 1 March 2015. The deadline for submitting the completed seminar papers (3,000 words) is 1 May 2015.



Conference Announcement

The traffic of Shakespeare’s stage invites spectators and readers to travel to different places, imagined and real. Italian and French cities – Verona, Venice, Mantua, Padua, Florence, Milan, Rome, Navarre, Roussillon, Paris, Marseilles – set the scenes of his plays. Rome, Athens, Ephesus and Troy occasion travels in time. On Britain’s map – divided in King Lear – other places are mapped: Scotland, England, Windsor, the Forest of Arden, York. Viola arrives on ‘the shore’ of Illyria while, in The Winter’s Tale, the action shifts between Bohemia and Sicilia. Othello sets up camp in Cyprus and Don Pedro returns, victorious, to Messina. Within the confines of one play, Hamlet, too, maps Europe: from Elsinore, Laertes requests permission to return to France; the Mousetrap is set in Vienna, which will become the setting for Measure for Measure; Hamlet is sent to England, and on his way encounters the Norwegian army marching across Denmark on its way to Poland.

Time and geographical travels map a whole continent and its social, political and cultural exchanges – a feature that Shakespeare’s plays shared with his early modern contemporaries as much as they have with his readers, editors, translators, spectators, film adaptors and critical commentators since.

The 2015 ESRA conference continues the long-standing dialogue between Shakespeare’s Europe and Europe’s Shakespeare(s). It asks scholars to take a look at the wider playwriting context of the early modern period and the European reception of Shakespeare as a subject that has been continuously developing, not least due to Europe’s several recent remappings. Twenty-five years since the first events that focused exclusively on European Shakespeares (Antwerp 1990) and Shakespeare in the New Europe (Sofia 1992), ESRA 2015 invites a look back at 425 years of European Shakespeare and towards a vigorous debate on what Shakespeare means for Europe today, as well as on ESRA’s place in Shakespeare Studies, European and beyond.

Workshop at the 5th World Congress on Universal Logic: The Idea of Logic, Historical Perspectives

Workshop at the 5th World Congress on Universal Logic, 25-30 June 2015 - Istanbul, Turkey

Workshop organized by: Juliette Lemaire (CNRS, Centre Léon Robin, France) & Amirouche Moktefi (Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia)

Logic as a discipline is not characterized by a stable scope throughout its history. True enough, the historical influence of Aristotelian logic over the centuries is something of a common denominator in Western philosophy. But Aristotelian logic certainly was not alone (see stoic logic for instance), not to mention non-western logics. Even within the Aristotelian tradition there is significant variability. Furthermore, as is well known, in the 19th century logic as a discipline underwent a radical modification, with the development of mathematical logic. The current situation is of logic having strong connections with multiple disciplines - philosophy, mathematics, computer science, linguistics - which again illustrates its multifaceted nature. 

The changing scope of logic through its history also has important philosophical implications: is there such a thing as the essence of logic, permeating all these different developments? Or is the unity of logic as a discipline an illusion? What can the study of the changing scope of logic through its history tell us about the nature of logic as such? What do the different languages used for logical inquiry - regimented natural languages, diagrams, logical formalisms - mean for the practices and results obtained?

This workshop will focus on both the diversity and the unity of logic through time. Topics may include:
  • Historical analyses on what specific logicians or logic traditions considered to be the nature and scope of logic. 
  • Historical analyses illustrating differences in scope and techniques with respect to the current conception of logic, but also suggesting points of contact and commonalities between these past traditions and current developments 
  • Historical and philosophical discussions on the place of logic among the sciences and its applications/relations with other disciplines, now and then. 
  • Discussions of the logical monism vs. logical pluralism issue in view of the historical diversity/unity of logic over time 
  • General philosophical reflections on what (if anything) the diversity of scope and practice in the history of logic can tell us about the nature of logic and the role of universal logic as such. 

Abstracts (500 words maximum) should be sent via e-mail before DECEMBER 1ST, 2014 to:

juliette.lemaire@paris-sorbonne.fr [1]
and/or
moktefi@unistra.fr [2]

Notification of acceptance: December 15th, 2014
More information on the congress is available at:
http://www.uni-log.org/enter-istanbul [3]


Links:
------
[1] mailto:juliette.lemaire@paris-sorbonne.fr
[2] mailto:moktefi@unistra.fr
[3] http://www.uni-log.org/enter-istanbul

Spenser Society Conference: The Place of Spenser / Spenser’s Places

The Fifth International Spenser Society Conference
Dublin, 18-20 June 2015

The International Spenser Society invites proposals for their next International Conference, to be held in Dublin, Ireland. The conference will address Spenser’s places – domestic, urban, global, historical, colonial, rhetorical, geopolitical, etc. – but also the place of Spenser in Renaissance studies, in the literary tradition, in Britain, in Ireland, in the literary and political cultures of his own moment.

Additionally, a series of programmed focus panels will offer opportunities for discussion of recent important initiatives and directions in Spenser studies: editing; biography; style; Ireland; philosophy and religion; teaching; and digital approaches.

We welcome abstracts from Spenser scholars and Renaissance scholars, graduate students and faculty, for papers that address Spenser’s historical, cultural and literary environments. These include the places and spaces in which he worked and the places and positions through which we approach that work.

The conference will take place in historic Dublin Castle (http://www.dublincastle.ie/) in the heart of the city, with accommodation available in local hotels. It follows the success of four previous ISS conferences, at Princeton (1990), Yale (1996), Cambridge (2001), and Toronto (2006).

An optional bus tour to Kilcolman castle, County Cork and other Spenser-related sites will take place June 21st.

Plenaries: Helen Cooper (University of Oxford), Jeffrey Dolven (Princeton University), Anne Fogarty (University College Dublin)

Confirmed speakers/presiders: Andrew Hadfield, Beth Quitslund, David Lee Miller, Julian Lethbridge, Ayesha Ramachandran, Joseph Loewenstein, Andrew Zurcher, David Wilson-Okamura, Patricia Palmer, Willy Maley, Susannah Brietz Monta, Kevin De Ornellas

Abstracts should be submitted directly to the conference website: www.spenser2015.com

The closing date for submissions is 15 September 2014

Suggested topics might include (but are not restricted to) the following:
  • The reception of Spenser’s poetry
  • Spenser among the poets
  • Spenser and political writing
  • Digital Spenser
  • Spenser and the Sidneys
  • Spenser’s place in Renaissance studies
  • Spenser’s Europe
  • Spenser’s place in Irish studies
  • Spenser’s social networks
  • Spenser and the politics of space
  • Spenser’s imaginative spaces
  • Spenser and early modern Dublin
  • Editing Spenser
  • Spenser and early modern London
  • Spenser in Munster
  • Spenser and Shakespeare
  • Spenser and Raleigh
  • Spenser’s Atlantic world
  • Spenser, history and historiography
  • Spenser and archaeology
  • Material Spenser/Spenser’s materials
  • Structural/topomorphic approaches
  • Spenser’s style
  • Religion and philosophy
  • Spenser’s Books
  • Teaching Spenser

We also invite proposals for poster-board demonstrations of relevant digital and other projects.

Conference Organisers:

Jane Grogan (University College Dublin), Andrew King (University College Cork), Thomas Herron (East Carolina University)

Sponsored by the International Spenser Society

http://www.english.cam.ac.uk/spenseronline/iss/

CALL FOR PAPERS: IASEMS Conference 2015 - Humour in Shakespeare's Arcadia: Gender, Genre and Wordplay in Early Modern Comedy

Florence, 23rd April 2015

The 2015 Italian Association of Shakespearean and Early Modern Studies (IASEMS) Graduate Conference at The British Institute in Florence is a one-day interdisciplinary and bilingual English-Italian forum open to PhD students and researchers who have obtained their doctorates within the past 5 years. This year’s conference will focus on the theme of comedy in early modern texts, and on how humour is produced in language and plot, what purposes it serves and how it can be related to issues of gender and genre. From Mikhail Bakhtin’s emphasis on the comic body to more recent explorations of the way erotic desire can be displaced by humour, early modern texts offer endless examples of improvisatory, situational or physical humour (whether deriving from the Elizabethan clown tradition or from the comic counterparts in medieval miracle and mystery plays) as well as sophisticated scripted humour and parody of romantic clichés. As is well known, humour, or “comic relief” can also be found in non-comic texts, such as tragedies, romances, epic poetry or pamphlets, often causing disruption of generic expectations and blurring the lines of genre distinction. Proposals can therefore address, from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives, the impact and the implications of humour or comedic infiltrations in a wide range of early modern English texts. 

Candidates are invited to send a description of their proposed contribution according to the following guidelines:
  • the candidate should provide name, institution, contact info, title and a short abstract of the proposed contribution (300 words for a 20-minute paper), explaining the content and intended structure of the paper, and including a short bibliography 
  • abstracts are to be submitted by Friday 31 October 2014 by email to ilaria.natali@unifi.it 
  • all proposals will be blind-vetted. The list of selected papers will be available by the end of November 2014 
  • each finished contribution is to last no longer than 20 minutes and is to be presented in English (an exception will 
  • be made for Italian candidates of departments other than English, who can present papers in Italian): Candidates whose first language is not English will need to have their proposals and final papers checked by a mother-tongue speaker 
  • participants will be asked to present a final draft of the paper ten days before the Conference. Selected speakers who are IASEMS members can apply for a small grant 

(http://www.maldura.unipd.it/iasems/iasems_about.html)
For further information please contact Ilaria Natali (ilaria.natali@unifi.it)

The Halved Heart, Shakespeare and Friendship

17 – 19 April 2015

For men and women in Shakespeare’s England, friendship was a relation that spanned the exquisite virtue of amicitia perfecta and the everyday exchanges of neighbourliness and commerce. A friend might be ‘another self’, but it was essential to be wary of false friends or flatterers. The complex nature of early modern friendship was a rich source of inspiration for early modern dramatists. Globe Education at Shakespeare’s Globe is pleased to announce our spring  conference, The Halved Heart: Shakespeare and Friendship (Friday 17 – Sunday 19 April 2015), and we invite proposals for papers and panels.

Speakers may address the Renaissance fascination with the ethical demands of idealised friendship, or the pragmatic reality of instrumental alliances, as explored on stage. Papers might consider the theatre as a site of social promiscuity, where spectators could be instructed in the arts (and hazards) of friendship even as such relationships were enacted in the auditorium. Or they might examine the overlap between friendship and eroticism, and the points of conflict between friendship and other forms of social alliance such as marriage, or the relationship between monarch and subject.

The conference will conclude on Sunday 19 April with a staged reading by a company of Globe actors of The Faithful Friends (Anon., King’s Men, c.1614).

Proposals of no more than 300 words for papers (or panels of up to three papers) may be submitted to Dr Will Tosh on will.t@shakespearesglobe.com.

The deadline for submissions is Friday 12 December 2014.
The conference is for scholars and students but is open to all members of the public who are interested in debates about early modern theatre and friendship.
shakespearesglobe.com/education

CALL FOR PAPERS: Othello's Island 2015

The Annual Conference of the Byzantine, Medieval and Renaissance Periods and their legacies in art, culture, history, literature, etc.

3rd Annual Conference 20-22 March 2015, at the Severis Foundation, Nicosia, Cyprus, (with additional day trip on 23 March)

Convenors:
Emeritus Professor James Fitzmaurice, Northern Arizona University (USA)
Professor Lisa Hopkins, Sheffield Hallam University (UK)
Dr Sarah James, University of Kent at Canterbury (UK)
Dr Michael Paraskos, Cyprus College of Art
Benedict Read FSA, University of Leeds (UK)

Confirmed keynote speakers:
Dr Roger Christofides, University of Huddersfield (UK)
Dr Chris Laoutaris, University of Birmingham (UK)

​We invite initial expressions of interest from academics, independent scholars, members of the public and learned societies in the third European conference on medieval and renaissance cultural and historical studies, Othello's Island. This is being held at the Costas and Rita Severis Foundation, Nicosia, Cyprus, from the 20th to the 22nd March 2015.

​The conference, now in its third year, is developing into an interesting and unique event in the medieval and renaissance studies calendar, combining fascinating academic debate with time spent discovering and exploring the remarkable Mediterranean island of Cyprus. It is always worth remembering that Cyprus was one of the richest kingdoms in the medieval world, being ruled by French and Venetian monarchs and generals for almost 400 years.

The conference Othello's Island has an inevitable bias towards the Mediterranean and Levant simply because of our location. However this is a result of self selection by potential speakers and we are in truth interested in hearing papers on all aspects of medieval and renaissance culture and history.

The conference will take place at the Severis Foundation in the historic old town area of Nicosia from 20 to 22 March 2015, and there will be an optional trip to see the stunning painted churches of the Troodhos mountains on 23 March. These churches are UNESCO protected (for more details click here).

Possible topics for the conference could include:
  • Diverse aspects of medieval and/or renaissance historical and/or cultural studies
  • Aspects of Byzantine historical and/or cultural studies
  • Aspects of Ottoman or other Muslim states historical and/or cultural studies
  • Art, literature and other aspects of culture from the medieval and renaissance periods
  • Connections between late Antiquity and the medieval period
  • Christian and muslim interactions and/or comparative studies
  • The Mediterranean as a factor in medieval and renaissance history and/or culture
  • Shakespeare and/or other writers of the medieval and/or renaissance periods
  • Continuing legacies of the medieval and renaissance culture in the modern period
  • The West, the Mediterranean and the Levant
  • Other aspects of the medieval and/or renaissance periods.

However, at this stage the aim is not to be prescriptive, and so we are open to all suggestions for sessions that explore the medieval and renaissance worlds, or subsequent legacies of those worlds (for example the rise of neo-medievalism in nineteenth-century Europe).

Possible Session (Strand) Organisers
(please note early deadline for strand organisers)

We invite expressions of interest from individuals, groups or organisations interested in convening specific strands within the conference.

Sessions are defined as comprising at least three papers on a common theme. Once your theme and session title is agreed we will advertise it with a Call for Papers specific to your session strand, but the decision on whether to admit any papers submitted to your strand will remain with you. We also ask that where possible you canvas your contacts to submit paper proposals for your session.

If you are interested in proposing a session or strand please contact Dr Michael Paraskos at michael@artcyprus.org before 30 September 2014.

Call for Papers from Individuals
(later deadline for individuals - but we advise early submission)

If you are interested in giving a talk at the conference please submit a proposal for a paper. Standard papers are 20 minutes long, followed by 10 minutes for questions.

​We are very open minded on the topic of papers, so if you have an idea for a presentation that is not covered by the suggestions given above please feel free to submit a proposal, or contact us first to discuss the idea.

Proposals for papers should comprise a cover sheet showing:

1. Your title (eg. Mr, Ms, Dr, Prof. etc.) and full name
2. Your institutional affiliation (if any)
3. Your postal address, e'mail address and telephone number
4. The title of your proposed paper

With this you should send a proposal/abstract for your paper of no more than 300 words and a copy of your CV/resume to mparaskos@mac.com with the subject line OTHELLO 2015.

All papers must be delivered in English.

The deadline for submissions is 31 January 2015. Early submission is strongly advised. We aim to have a decision on the acceptance of papers within four weeks of submission.


The Royal Society - Publish or Perish? Scientific periodicals from 1665 to the present

19-21 March 2015, The Royal Society, London

To celebrate the anniversary of the Philosophical Transactions, the world’s oldest scientific journal, the Royal Society will be hosting a major conference in spring 2015. At a time when the future of scientific publishing is in flux, this conference will take the long perspective by examining the transformations and challenges in the publishing of scientific journals over the last three and a half centuries, and into the future. We seek offers of papers, or proposals for three- or four-paper panels, which engage with any aspect of the commercial, editorial and distribution practices of scientific journal publishing, in any period since 1665, preferably with a comparative or longue durée perspective.

Papers or panels might address:
  • The processes of printing, publishing or illustrating scientific journals
  • The commercial practices of journal publishing
  • The development of editorial and refereeing processes
  • Distribution networks and marketing – regional, national and international
  • Issues concerning the status, reputation and reception of competing journals
Offers of papers, including a 250-word abstract, should be sent to publishorperish@royalsociety.org by the 30th of November 2013.

Participants must be willing and able to prepare their paper for speedy publication in autumn 2015.

Philosophical Transactions at 350

The Philosophical Transactions turns 350 on March the 6th, 2015. To celebrate this milestone in the history of science communication, a programme of events and activities is being planned for the Anniversary year. In addition, a major AHRC-funded research project, led by Dr Aileen Fyfe at the University of St Andrews in partnership with the Royal Society, is already under way, which will produce the first full history of the Philosophical Transactions.

www.royalsociety.org
https://arts.st.andrews.ac.uk/philosophicaltransactions/

Dr Noah Moxham
School of History, University of St Andrews
Postdoctoral Research Fellow

The Marginalisation of Astrology

Utrecht, 19-20 March 2015; Deadline 30 September 2014






The Descartes Centrum for history of science of the University of Utrecht, in collaboaration with the department of philosophy of the Radboud University at Nijmegen, will host an international conference on the problem of the marginalization of astrology in the early modern period.

Astrology has been a well-established and respected part of scholarship for centuries, practiced in many cultural and geographical settings. However, in the modern world, astrology, though still very much present, has lost its scientific status and is relegated to the fringes of serious learning. In the history of the sciences, this must be regarded as a momentous shift. The definite step in the “marginalization” of astrology appears to have been taken in the seventeenth century and should therefore be regarded as an important element (rather than as a consequence) of the so-called Scientific Revolution.

The reasons for this development are far from clear. Actually, even the development itself (when, where and by whom did astrology become disavowed) has so far been only poorly documented. The conference therefore aims at bringing together specialists from various fields to throw light on this intruiging question.

It is the aim of the conference to study the subject from various different angles:

· History of astrology. Although the project is about people NOT practising astrology rather than about astrologers, the history of astrology proper remains of course central. At the very least, an attempt should be made to compare differences in astrological practice (and their marginalization) between various local, cultural and religious contexts. Other relevant questions concern criticisms and apologies of astrology and attempts at astrological reform.

· History of science. The idea that astrology was discredited directly because of new scientific discoveries is no longer regarded as credible; on the other hand, it does not appears believable that there was no connection at all. The dismissal of astrology implied a transformation of the work and the identity of astronomers. In natural philosophy, it implied a rejection of the idea of celestial influence, which had become an integral part of scholastic philosophy.

· History of medicine. Medicine was a major application of astrology. Medieval physicians would routinely cast horoscopes for diagnostic and other purposes. The question is when and how this changed. Obviously, both the supply and the demand sides have to be taken into account.

· Court culture. Important on the side of demand were princely and noble courts. In the sixteenth century, princes would regularly employ court mathematicians/astronomers, whose task it was to cast horoscopes. In the seventeenth century, on the other hand, Louis XIV spent a fortune on the Paris Observatory, while casting horoscopes was not among the tasks of this institution. Again, the reasons behind this change are not clear.

· Print culture. Almanacs, ephemerides, and prognostics, in conjunction with information on their makers, editions, and distribution, should enable us (at least) to get some idea of the popularity, or lack of popularity, of astrological ideas and practices. This is a field wherein some work has already been done.

· History of religion. The era of the Reformation and Counter Reformation saw important developments in the field of theology, Church discipline and organization, which may have affected the status of astrology. One should also look to what one might call religious anthropology: shifting attitudes toward the supernatural and a changing definition of “superstition”, more or less identifiable with Weber’s “disenchantment of the world”. It is not clear to what extent astrology (as a learned practice) was placed in the same category as other superstitions, but the question should be asked.

· Finally, the question to what extent this development remained limited to Western Europe, and whether similar things happened elsewhere (and when), should not be forgotten, even if it is probably hard to answer at this stage.

People who are interested to give a paper at this conference are invited to send a title and abstract (300 words maximum) by the end of September to the organizers:

· Rienk Vermij, history of science, University of Oklahoma (rienk.vermij@ou.edu)

· Hiro Hirai, department of philosophy, University of Nijmegen (hhirai2@gmail.com)

For all other information, please also contact the organizers mentioned above.

Magic and Intellectual History

Thursday 5th March 2015 - CREMS, University of York

A day symposium – Keynote speaker: Dr Stephen Clucas (Birkbeck)

This symposium will explore the place of magic in the intellectual culture of early modern England and Europe. It will focus on how magic was perceived and understood in philosophical, religious and scientific thought, and the ambivalence that surrounded it as topics of scholarship.

Papers might attend to the following:
  • How did early modern thought accommodate magic into its disciplines?
  • Why was magic the object of so much ‘elite’ scientific and philosophical thought?
  • Magic and the study of nature
  • Magic and the ineffable
  • Redefining the parameters of magic
  • Magic and religion.
  • The occult and hidden operations of nature
  • Scepticism and magical thought
  • Magic and language / magic and metaphor
  • Literature and the portrayal of magic
  • Magic and the devil
  • Magicians and their day-jobs.

Call for Papers: Abstracts by 15th October (c. 250 words)

Contact: Kevin Killeen, kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk

This symposium is part of a diffuse and ongoing Thomas Browne Seminar that has digressed quite far: http://www.york.ac.uk/english/news-events/browne/


Overview

The Thomas Browne Seminar is a forum for exploring the intellectual history of the seventeenth century, the relations between its apparently incompatible disciplines and the social, scientific and political contexts in which they arose. It is not, by any means, restricted to Thomas Browne himself, but also examines more broadly the intellectual culture in the mid-seventeenth century.

Papers are invited on any aspect of mid-century culture, the history of science and scholarship, religious and antiquarian thought, natural history, politics and the history of trivia, in particular, but not restricted to, those related to Browne. As the seminar will involve an ongoing series of meetings, ideas for future seminars are also invited.

The TBS is run jointly by the Department of English and Related Literature and the Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies. Thomas Browne was a significant figure in the scholarly and scientific community of the seventeenth century, who nevertheless defies categorisation and whose blend of humanism, scholasticism and natural philosophy is testament to the intellectual flux of the period.

Research workshop: Mathematical readers in the early modern world

Thursday 18 and Friday 19 December 2014
All Souls College, Oxford

How was mathematical writing consumed – read, used, responded to, and otherwise engaged with – in the early modern period? What was distinctive about mathematical reading, compared with the reading of other kinds of technical writing, or with the reading of prose more generally? Were mathematical books handled or annotated in distinctive ways? Was mathematical reading associated with a distinctive set of locations? How, where and when did readers learn the (presumptively specialized) skills of mathematical reading? These questions will be the subject of this two-day workshop, to be held in All Souls College, Oxford.

Confirmed speakers:
Ken Clements, Illinois State University
Nerida Ellerton, Illinois State University
Kathryn James, Yale University
Yelda Nasifoglu, McGill University
Benjamin Wardhaugh, University of Oxford

Proposals for papers are invited on all aspects of reading and consuming mathematics in the early modern world. Proposals should include an abstract of no more than 250 words and a brief CV, and should be emailed to benjamin.wardhaugh@all-souls.ox.ac.uk by 1 September 2014. The conference can contribute to travel costs for speakers.

‘Ideas and Enlightenment’ The Long Eighteenth Century (Down Under)

University of Sydney, 10-13 December 2014, proposals due 15 June

David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies XV

The Sydney Intellectual History Network and ‘Putting Periodisation to Use’ Research Group at the University of Sydney invite you to the Fifteenth David Nichol Smith Seminar (DNS), with the theme ‘Ideas and Enlightenment’. Inaugurated and supported by the National Library of Australia, the DNS conference is the leading forum for eighteenth-century studies in Australasia. It brings together scholars from across the region and internationally who work on the long eighteenth century (1688-1815) in a range of disciplines, including history, literature, art and architectural history, philosophy, the history of science, musicology, anthropology, archaeology and studies of material culture.

We welcome proposals for papers or panels on the following topics, although please note that the conference organisers are open to proposals for subjects that fall outside of these broad themes:
  • Making Ideas Visible
  • Biography and the History of Individual Life
  • Economic Ideas in Social and Political Contexts
  • Global Sensibilities
  • National Identity and Cosmopolitanism
  • Antiquaries and Alternative Versions of the Classical Tradition
  • Periodisation and the question of Period Styles
  • ‘Enlightenment’ and the Pacific
  • Spectacle, Sociability and Pleasure
  • Genres of Enlightenment
  • Science, Technology and Medicine
  • Borders and Empire
  • Historiography of the Enlightenment
  • Post-Enlightenment trajectories in literature and art

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers. Proposals consist of a 250-word abstract and 2-page cv, sent via email as a pdf attachment tosihn.dns@sydney.edu.au. Deadline for submissions: 15 June 2014

Further details are at http://sydney.edu.au/intellectual-history/news-events/dns-conference-201..., where accommodation and keynotes will be posted soon. If you have questions about the conference, please contact the organizing committee at sihn.dns@sydney.edu.au.

DNS XV Organizing Committee: Dr Jennifer Ferng, Prof Mark Ledbury, Prof Jennifer Milam and Dr Nicola Parsons

Henry More (1614-1687): A Conference to mark the fourth centenary of his birth

Date: Friday 5 December 2014

Place: The Warburg Institute

Organisers: Sarah Hutton and Guido Giglioni

Despite being one of the most important thinkers in seventeenth-century British philosophy, Henry More has been denied the status of proper philosopher that his contemporaries Hobbes and Locke have long enjoyed. More’s work deserves to be recognized as a significant contribution to early modern philosophy. He was a figure who relentlessly engaged with the most pressing issues of his time. He intervened in the debate about the new science of nature and medicine, contributed in an original way to the recovery of Platonism and various elements of the classical tradition, left a lasting impact on the literary scene, played a role in the contemporary religious controversies and, finally, demonstrated a remarkable ability in identifying and reacting to the major cultural trends of the period.

This conference will take advantage of More’s centenary to engage in a one-day reappraisal of his legacy. It will do so against the background of a more nuanced and historicized understanding of early modern philosophy, theology and science, which have resulted in a more positive consideration of Renaissance theories of universal animation, a reassessment of the meaning of early modern experimental knowledge, the acknowledgment of the productive interplay of philology and philosophy advocated by the humanist movement, and, finally, a more balanced attitude towards the role that religious and theological arguments play in shaping metaphysical and logical ideas.

Speakers include: Alan Gabbey (Barnard), Guido Giglioni (Warburg Institute), Douglas Hedley (Cambridge), Sarah Hutton (Aberystwyth), David Leech (Bristol), Cecilia Muratori (Warwick), Jasper Reid (KCL).

Programme:

10.00 Registration and coffee

10.45 Morning session - Chair: Stephen Clucas (Birkbeck, University of London)

Introduction: Sarah Hutton (University of Aberystwyth)

Jasper Reid (King’s College) - More's Place in Seventeenth-Century Thought

Guido Giglioni (Warburg Institute) - Henry More’s Psychozoia and the Epic of Emanation

Douglas Hedley (University of Cambridge) - Henry More and Nathaniel Ingelo: The Platonic Imagination in Cambridge?

12.30 Lunch

1.30 Afternoon session - Chair: Richard Serjeantson (University of Cambridge)

Cecilia Muratori (University of Warwick) - Henry More on Animals

Sarah Hutton (University of Aberystwyth) - Henry More and Renaissance Philosophy: More's Response to Girolamo Cardano in his Of the Immortality of the Soul

3.15 Tea

3.45

David Leech (University of Bristol) - Henry More on the ‘Boniform Faculty’

Alan Gabbey (Barnard College, Columbia University) - Philosophia Spinozana Destructa: Henry More (1671-1679)

5.30 Reception

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Registration Details

Conference fees
Conference fees (which include coffee/tea, and a sandwich lunch) are as follows:

Standard rate: £25

Concessionary rate: £12.50 (for full-time students/retired)

CONFERENCE CATERING: We provide a range of meat/fish and vegetarian rolls/sandwiches for lunch. If you have other dietary requirements please email warburg(at)sas.ac.uk at least ten days before the conference so that we can try to cater for your needs.


Registering and paying for a conference/course

Please note that in order to attend Institute conferences you need to register and pay online in advance. PLEASE NOTE THAT CONFERENCE SPEAKERS DO NOT NEED TO REGISTER OR PAY TO ATTEND CONFERENCES.

CLICK ON LINK BELOW TO REGISTER ONLINE

http://store.london.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=5&catid=38&prodid=751

NB: online registration closes 30 HOURS BEFORE the start of each conference (i.e. at midnight two days before the conference).

Alternative Payment Arrangements

If you are registering for a 2 day conference but only wish to attend for one day, please email warburg(at)sas.ac.uk to register. In your email please say which day of the conference you wish to attend and whether you are standard or concessionary rate (as explained above under Conference fees).

If you are unable to pay online, you can pay by cheque or cash in advance of the conference, but only if you are based in the UK. Attendees from outside the UK must pay online in advance.

· To pay by cheque: please send your cheque made out to The University of London with a note of your name, email, phone number, name of your institution if relevant, and the name of the conference you wish to attend to: Warburg Events, The Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AB.

· To pay in cash: please visit the Institute to pay on weekdays from 10.00 to 13.00, or 14.00 to 17.00.

Society for Neo-Latin Studies, Annual Lecture

November 28th 5 p.m.

‘Warwick in London’ premises, The Shard (32 London Bridge St, London SE1 9SG)

Dr Catarina Fouto (KCL)
‘Horace, Prudentius and Buchanan in Jacobus Tevius’s Epodon libri tres (1565): Classical and Christian Letters in Counter-Reformation Portugal’

Diogo de Teive (Jacobus Tevius) is often remembered as Buchanan’s friend and companion in misfortune when he was convicted in 1551 at the hands of the Portuguese Inquisition. However, after his conviction Teive went on to become one of the most successful Portuguese court poets of his time, boasting the patronage of Cardinal Henrique, the regent and Portuguese General Inquisitor.

While the expurgated reading of Horace’s Epodon and the deliberate imitation of Prudentius’s Peristephanon in Teive’s Epodon libri tres are in tune with the orthodoxy which prevailed at that time at the Portuguese court, there are also subtle examples of ambiguity towards it in this work. In Book II, which contains hymns to patron saints of Portugal, Teive celebrates the work of Prudentius and George Buchanan, establishing a genealogy of literary prestige which effaces the religious divide between Protestantism and Catholicism.

Due to security policy at The Shard, all visitors need to sign in: please contact Dr. Andrew Taylor (awt24@cam.ac.uk) before November 20th if you would like to attend the lecture.


‘Moveable Types: People, Ideas and Objects: Cultural exchanges in Early Modern Europe’

University of Kent, 27th-29th November

'Moveable Types' is a three-day conference, held at the University of Kent, which aims to re-examine the processes of cultural exchange in early modern Europe. Traditional historiography has tended to focus on a bilateral transfer of cultures, which, however meaningful, also lift out individual moments of cultural exchange from the environment which made such encounters not only possible, but also significant. By considering cultural exchange in discrete, isolated moments, one runs the risk of oversimplifying the complex networks of cultural exchange in Europe, and thereby skewing European history into a nation-centred perspective.

Recent scholarship such as histoire croisée, entangled histories, cultural translation and actor network theory (ANT) are, meanwhile, looking at such processes in their entirety, as a noisy hubbub rather than a dialogue between binaries (writer and reader, buyer and seller, one nation and another). These approaches explore a network of different elements and characters, all of which are given equal agency in shaping each others' views of the world.

This conference will explore the implications of these recent developments in scholarship by inviting papers with an interdisciplinary approach to cultural exchange in the early modern period. The objective is thus to question the binaries of traditional scholarship, and to suggest new ways of considering the cultural connections that were being formed, broken and reformed in this period.

Confirmed keynote speakers:
Andrew Pettegree (University of St Andrews);
Tiffany Stern (University of Oxford);
Gilles Bertrand (Université Pierre Mendès France, Grenoble);
Ruth Ahnert (Queen Mary, University of London).

We invite papers on the following topics:
  • literary translation and adaptation;
  • exchange of ideas (scientific, humanist, technological, artistic);
  • epistolary networks;
  • theory of cultural exchange or cultural networks;
  • paths of ambassadors, sailors, traders, book pedlars and other travellers;
  • news, gossip and news books;
  • spaces of cultural exchange: cities, fairs, universities, theatres;
  • the making, trading, and consumption of consumer items;
  • any other paper relating to early modern cultural exchange.

Abstracts should be sent to moveabletypesconference@gmail.com before 1st of August 2014 and should not be longer than 300 words. Please include affiliation and contact information, as well as a short biographical note, on a separate document. For more information please visit http://moveabletypes.wordpress.com/ or e-mail moveabletypesconference@gmail.com.

Conference Sponsors:
'Moveable Types' is supported by The Royal Historical SocietyThe University of Kent's School of HistoryThe Kent Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities (KIASH), and Text and Event in Early Modern Europe (TEEME).



London Renaissance Seminar: Renaissance Loves II

22 November, 1.30pm-5.00pm, room tbc, Birkbeck College, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1

1.30pm COFFEE

2.00pm Dr Sarah Carter (Nottingham Trent University), ‘ “With kissing him I should have killed him first”: Death in Ovid and Shakespeare’s Venus and Adonis’

Dr Eric Langley (UCL), ‘Try a little extendedness: paying attention to Renaissance tenderness’

TEA

4.00pm Ms Catrin Griffiths (Birkbeck), ‘Brotherly loves: Robert and Roger Boyle and the sanctified romance body’

DRINKS

The organisers for this event are Linda Grant (RHUL), Judith Hudson (Birkbeck), Sue Wiseman (Birkbeck)

It is funded by Royal Holloway & Birkbeck.

Contact: s.wiseman@bbk.ac.uk.

The London Renaissance Seminar meets at Birkbeck College, University of London to discuss topics in the culture of the Renaissance. Anyone with an interest in the Renaissance is welcome to attend. Seminars are usually held in the School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square.

London Renaissance Seminar contact s.wiseman@bbk.ac.uk
London Renaissance Seminar mailing list: t.f.healy@sussex.ac.uk

Forum for European Philosophy Public Lecture: Ethics Matters in the Family

Thursday 13 November, 6.30-8.00pm
Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

Adam Swift, Professor of Political Theory, University of Warwick

Chair: Gabriel Wollner, Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, LSE and Forum for European Philosophy Fellow

The family is hotly contested ideological terrain. Some defend the traditional two-parent heterosexual family while others welcome its demise. Opinions vary about how much control parents should have over their children’s upbringing. Adam Swift will discuss the ethics of parent-child relationships, telling us why the family is valuable, who has the right to parent, and what rights parents should -- and should not -- have over their children.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEfamily

Podcasts of most FEP events are available online after the event. They can be accessed at www.philosophy-forum.org

CALL FOR PAPERS: European Women in Early Modern Drama

Convenors: Dr Edel Semple, University College Cork, e.semple@ucc.ie
Dr Ema Vyroubalova, Trinity College Dublin, vyroubae@tcd.ie

While England’s early modern drama presents us with a plethora of foreign female characters – women such as Franceschina, the eponymous villain in The Dutch Courtesan, Queen Katherine in Henry VIII, the displaced Bella-Franca in Four Prentices of London, and Tamora in Titus Andronicus – no single study has taken these pervasive and significant figures as its focus. This seminar seeks to redress this gap in existing scholarship by exploring representations of European women in the drama of Shakespeare and his contemporaries.

Building on work by critics including Ton Hoenselaars, Jean E. Howard, Lloyd Edward Kermode, Michele Marrapodi, Jean-Christophe Mayer, Marianne Montgomery, and Jane Pettegree, and drawing on recent developments in studies of gender, race, culture, and politics, this seminar aims to explore why and how early modern dramatists repeatedly fashioned female characters of distinct nationalities. How notions of gender and foreignness intersect and/or diverge in early modern English play-texts will be the central concern of the seminar.

In a range of Elizabethan and Jacobean plays, foreign women are depicted as valuable links to European nations, and as threatening apertures within the English nation. In Sharpham’s The Fleer, for instance, the Italian courtesans bring strange customs to London, while in The Patient Man and the Honest Whore, the Italian courtesan is accused of spreading disease across national borders. Conversely, in Henry V, the ‘wooing’ of Katherine is a moment for linguistic exchange and she is seen as the desirable conduit to unite England and France. Thus, the seminar will consider how the staging of foreign women may enable English dramatists and their audiences to engage in debates about international relations, to deliberate on racial anxieties, to play out strategies of integration or exclusion, and to imagine England’s future vis-à-vis the rest of Europe.

Furthermore, in considering such a diverse range of characters, the seminar seeks to uncover points of commonality and difference in representations of European women, and will consider whether these women – from different nations, with varied social, religious, economic, and political identities – constitute a distinct phenomenon in the drama of the period. We are particularly interested in papers discussing theatrical depictions of European women as agents of and conduits for social, sexual, political, economic, linguistic and cultural interchange.

The papers may examine, among other aspects, representations of European women in early modern English drama in relation to:
  • social, sexual, or cultural encounters and interactions
  • notions and theories of race, ethnicity, hybridity, and miscegenation
  • misogyny and/or xenophobia
  • political and/or economic power
  • crime and transgression
  • linguistic exchange (e.g. accents or multilingualism)
  • religious and/or social identities and groups (e.g. refugees, economic migrants)
  • early modern geography and cartography
  • locations and their theatrical renderings
  • travel, travellers, and mobility
  • early modern staging (e.g. playhouses, costumes, or stage props)
  • printing and circulation of play-texts
  • source texts and/or dramatic genres

Please submit an abstract (200-300 words) and a brief biography (150 words) by 1 December 2014 to all seminar conveners. All participants will be notified about the acceptance of their proposals by 1 March 2015. The deadline for submitting the completed seminar papers (3,000 words) is 1 May 2015.

Dr. Edel Semple (School of English, University College Cork)
Dr. Ema Vyroubalová (School of English, Trinity College Dublin)
Email: europeanwomenESRA@gmail.com