'Love & the Word' – AULLA Conference 2016

Hosted by Victoria University, the Australasian Universities Languages & Literature Association Conference will be held in Melbourne, Australia from 7th-9th December 2016.

The conference theme draws on AULLA’s origins as an association of scholars working in fields of philology. Thus we examine both philos (love) and logos (word). How does affection affect words? What do people mean by ‘love’ and its counterparts in the world’s languages? Or perhaps: how does it ‘do’ those meanings?

We encourage papers with a focus on engaged studies and discussions of teaching practice and of critical/exegetical responses to creative practice. Papers that respond to ‘love and the word’ in the fields of languages, the literary study of other languages, and philosophical approaches to cultural expression are expressly welcome. We also expressly welcome interdisciplinary angles on the theme, such as Cultural Studies, Indigenous Studies, Postcolonial Studies, and comparative approaches.

The organisers welcome submissions for individual presentations of 20 minutes and panel sessions of 90 minutes. Please note, submissions are due by Monday the 29 February, 2016. Submissions should include: name/s of author/s (including affiliations), title of presentation, an abstract of up to 200 words, and a biographical note of up to 50 words per author. Panel proposals should include the above for each presentation as well as a title and abstract for the session as a whole. If you would like to nominate a chair for your panel session, that would also be welcome. To submit a proposal, please visit: Call for Papers


CALL FOR PAPERS: Authority Revisited: Towards Thomas More and Erasmus in 1516

Lectio International Conference 30th November - 3rd December 2016, University of Leuven, Belgium

In the year 1516, two crucial texts for the cultural history of the West saw the light: Thomas More’s Utopia and Desiderius Erasmus’s Novum Instrumentum. Both of these works dealt freely with authoritative sources of western civilization and opened new pathways of thought on the eve of invasive religious and political changes.

Lectio and the University of Leuven, in collaboration with its RefoRC-partners the Johannes a Lasco Library Emden and the Europäische Melanchthon Akademie Bretten as well as other partners, will mark the 500th birthday of both foundational texts by organizing a conference, from November 30 through December 2, 2016. The university city of Leuven is a most appropriate place to have this conference organized, since it was intimately involved in the genesis and the history of both works.

The conference will be devoted to studying not only the reception and influence of Utopia and the Novum Instrumentum in (early) modern times, but also their precursors in classical antiquity, the patristic period, and the middle ages. The conference will thus lead to a better understanding of how More and Erasmus used their sources, and it will address the more encompassing question of how these two authors, through their own ideas and their use of authoritative texts, have contributed to the rise of modern western thought.

The conference also explicitly aims at enhancing our understanding of iconographic, book-, and art-historical aspects of the transmission of the texts under consideration, both before and after the publication of the two works.

This multidisciplinary Lectio conference wants to bring together international scholars working in the field of theology, art history, philosophy, history of science and historical linguistics.


Thomas More: Utopia Revisited

More’s colorful description of the allegedly recently discovered island of Utopia was so influential as to lend its name to a literary genre. At the same time, although the name Utopia is a neologism invented in More's circle , the utopian tradition reaches back to antiquity.

Papers are invited on the following topics:

The best known examples from classical antiquity are Plato’s descriptions of the ideal state. Yet there are other instances, such as the myth of the golden age, elaborated in many different ways by numerous ancient writers. In addition, More had a thorough knowledge of the works by Greek and Roman thinkers such as Plutarch, Lucian, Cicero, and Seneca. The conference aims to map these ancient representations of the ideal state and to study the way in which More was influenced by them.

Equally influential is the Christian tradition, most prominently laid down in Augustine’s City of God, a text of central importance that marks the transition from antiquity to the middle ages. Augustine’s eschatological view of the perfect City may, for example, be the subject of contributions to the conference. By extension, the various forms of the mythical account of Cockaigne enter the picture as possible topics.

Also of direct impact on Utopia were reports about the New World (for example in the letters of Amerigo Vespucci, Christopher Columbus, or Peter Martyr of Anghiera) and the images of the New World in Europe. It would be an interesting contribution to the conference to study in which ways the discovery and description of an “unspoiled” world and its inhabitants inspired More’s views.

Renaissance humanists also influenced More’s Utopia. The most renowned example is, of course, Erasmus. But the views of other humanists, like Pico della Mirandola, also shaped More’s thought. Similarly, the scholastic tradition deserves to be studied in at this juncture. Renaissance humanism and scholasticism were difficult to reconcile, according to More, and on more than one occasion he sets one over against the other.

The conference shall also pay due attention to the reception of Utopia in early modern times, both in the vernacular and in Latin. Authors such as Tommaso Campanella, Vasco de Quiroga, Francis Bacon, Johann Eberlin, Kaspar Stiblin, and Johann Valentin Andreae may be investigated in this regard, as well as the genre of the picaresque novel.

Of particular interest are iconographic, book-, and art-historical aspects of the transmission of Utopia as well as the works of More’s predecessors.

Erasmus: The New Testament Revisited 

Erasmus’s revision of the New Testament text was groundbreaking. Obviously, however, Erasmus’s foundational work cannot be properly understood apart from his predecessors’ endeavors to translate the Bible and to comment on it, or to deal with the Bible from a text-critical perspective.

Papers are invited on the following topics:

Papers studying biblical exegesis in Christian antiquity and its reception in the works by Erasmus. More in particular, paper topics may include Jerome’s Vulgata, Origen’s Hexapla, and relevant commentaries on Scripture, such as those of Chrysostom and others. Erasmus’s recourse to classical language and culture in the Annotationes to his New Testament may also be the subject of paper proposals.

Medieval biblical exegesis: Even though self-declared pioneers like Erasmus and the Renaissance humanists were not keen to be associated with medieval biblical exegesis, this aspect of possible influences and sources cannot be neglected. The conference invites contributions on the biblical Renaissance of the twelfth century and later (among others, the Glossa ordinaria, Hugh of St. Victor and the Parisian Victorines, Peter Comestor, Peter Cantor and Stephen Langton, Hugh of St. Cher and Nicholas of Lyra). In sum, the conference aims to explore the extent to which Erasmus and his fellow humanists integrated the progress made by medieval biblical exegesis.

The link between Erasmus and Renaissance humanism, both in northern Europe (Agricola, Cornelius Gerardi Aurelius) and in Italy (Lorenzo Valla, Gianozzo Manetti). The main question is here how Erasmus’s Christian humanism did relate to the broader cultural historical current of renewed textual criticism.

The reception of Erasmus’s text-critical and exegetical work in the early modern era will be explored through the establishment of (new) authoritative version(s) of the New Testament and the debates that accompanied the process (Novum Instrumentum, Vulgata, Textus Receptus) as well as the elaboration of humanist, Protestant, and Catholic exegesis, from Luther and Melanchthon through Beza, from Dorpius, Franciscus Lucas Brugensis and Jansenius Gandavensis, via Estienne, Arias Montanus, through Maldonatus, etc. We further look forward to receiving papers on how Erasmus’ New Testament was used in the development of early modern vernacular versions, on all sides of the confessional spectrum.

Of particular interest are iconographic, book-, and art-historical aspects of the transmission of the texts, both of Erasmus’s predecessors and of Erasmus’s Novum Instrumentum.

Papers may be given in English or French and the presentation should take 20 minutes.
To submit a proposal, please send an abstract of approximately 300 words (along with your name, academic affiliation and contact information) to lectio@kuleuven.be by January 15, 2016. Notification of acceptance will be given by the end of March 2016.

The publication of selected papers is planned in a volume to be included in the peer-reviewed LECTIO Series (Brepols Publishers).

Invited speakers:Gillian Clark (University of Bristol)
Henk Jan De Jonge (Leiden University) 
Günter Frank (Europäische Melanchthon Akademie)
Brad Gregory (University of Notre Dame)
Quentin Skinner (Queen Mary University of London)

Venue: The Leuven Institute for Ireland in Europe, Janseniusstraat 1, 3000 Leuven

Organising Committee:
Erik De Bom, Anthony Dupont, Wim François, Jan Papy, Marleen Reynders, Andrea Robiglio, Violet Soen, Gerd Van Riel 

Scientific Committee:
Rita Beyers (U Antwerpen), Erik De Bom (KU Leuven), Anthony Dupont (KU Leuven), Wim François (KU Leuven), Günter Frank (Europäische Melanchthon Akademie, Bretten), Jan Papy (KU Leuven), Andrea Robiglio (KU Leuven), Herman Selderhuis (Johannes a Lasco Bibliothek, Emden), Violet Soen (KU Leuven), Gerd Van Riel (KU Leuven), Wim Verbaal (U Gent)

Contact:
Lectio KU Leuven
Faculties of Arts, Law, Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies Blijde Inkomststraat 5
3000 Leuven
BELGIUM
+32 16 328778
lectio@kuleuven.be
www.ghum.kuleuven.be/lectio



CALL FOR PAPERS: Shakespearean Transformations: Death, Life, and Afterlives

7th Biennial British Shakespeare Association Conference

University of Hull, 8-11 September 2016
www.hull.ac.uk/bsa2016

Keynote speakers:
Susan Bassnett (University of Warwick)
Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex)
Michael Neill (University of Auckland)
Claudia Olk (Free University of Berlin)
Barrie Rutter (Northern Broadsides)
Tiffany Stern (University of Oxford)
Richard Wilson (Kingston University)

‘Remember me!’ commands the ghost of Hamlet’s father at a moment in English history when the very purpose of remembrance of the dead was being transformed. How does the past haunt the present in Shakespeare? What do Shakespeare’s works reveal about the processes of mourning and remembrance? Shakespeare breathed new life into ‘old tales’: how do his acts of literary resuscitation transform the material he revived and what it signifies? This major international conference will investigate the ways in which Shakespeare remembered the past and we remember Shakespeare.

The 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death offers us a timely opportunity to reflect upon the continuation of his life and art diachronically, spatially from the Globe across the globe, and materially on stage, page, canvas, music score, and screen. How does Shakespeare continue to haunt us? The second strand of the conference focuses on Shakespeare’s literary, dramatic, and transcultural afterlives. The conference thus also seeks to explore the various ways in which Shakespeare’s ghost has been invoked, summoned up, or warded off over the past four centuries.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:
  • Shakespearean transformations: borrowing/adaptation/appropriation/intertextuality
  • Shakespeare and death
  • Speaking to/of and impersonating the dead in Shakespeare
  • Shakespeare, religion, and reformations of ritual
  • Shakespeare and memory/remembrance
  • Shakespeare and time: temporality/anachronism/archaism
  • Shakespeare and early modern conceptions of ‘life’
  • Emotion and embodiment in Shakespeare
  • Performing Shakespeare: now and then
  • Transcultural Shakespeare
  • Critical and theoretical conceptions of/engagements through Shakespeare
  • Textual resurrections: editing Shakespeare
  • Rethinking Shakespearean biography
  • Enlivening Shakespeare teaching
  • Shakespeare in a digital age

The conference will be held in the official run-up to Hull’s year as the UK’s City of Culture in 2017. The programme will include plenary lectures, papers, seminars, workshops, and performances at Hull Truck and the Gulbenkian Centre. There will also be special workshops and sessions directed towards pedagogy.

We welcome proposals for papers (20 minutes), panels (90 minutes), or seminars/workshops (90 minutes) on any aspect of the conference theme, broadly interpreted. Abstracts (no more than 200 words) should be sent to bsa2016@hull.ac.uk by 15 December 2015.

Participants must be members of the British Shakespeare Association at the time of the conference. Details of how to join can be found here: www.britishshakespeare.ws

CALL FOR PAPERS: Society for Renaissance Studies 7th Biennial Conference

Society for Renaissance Studies 7th Biennial Conference
School of Culture and Creative Arts, University of Glasgow
18-20 July, 2016

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
Professor Neil Rhodes (University of St Andrews): ‘Making Common in Sixteenth-Century England’
Professor Willy Maley (University of Glasgow): ‘“Patsy Presbys”, or “Pulling the Wool Off Living Sheep”: Milton’s Observations (1649) and Ulster Presbyterianism’
Professor Evelyn Welch (King’s College, London): ‘Renaissance Skin’

We invite proposals for panels and for individual papers from Renaissance scholars from the disciplines of archaeology, architecture, history of art, history, history of science and medicine, literature, music, philosophy and other fields. Proposals for panels (90 minutes) and individual papers (20 minutes) should engage with one of the following themes:
  • Anachronisms
  • Conflict and Resolution
  • Imaging the Nation
  • Reformations and Recusants
  • Beasts
  • Word and Image

The conference will also feature an open strand for papers which engage with themes other than those suggested.

Proposals (max. 400 words) are welcome from both postgraduates and established scholars. They should be sent by Friday 2 October, 2015 to the conference organizers, Mr Andrew Bradburn & Dr Tom Nichols, arts-rensoc2016@glasgow.ac.uk.

Accompanying events will include: visits to leading Renaissance sites and collections in and around Glasgow (including Stirling Castle) and an exhibition of Renaissance prints at the Hunterian Art Gallery.

Further details (e.g. full programme, registrations forms and information about accommodation) will be posted as they become available.

Please note that the Society is particularly keen to encourage postgraduates to offer papers, and we will be able to offer generous bursaries to cover travel, registration and accommodation expenses. Further information about bursary applications will be disseminated in due course.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Dressing Global Bodies

The clothes on our backs...

are intimately connected with bodily experiences, cultural, social and gender portrayals. Economies of fashioning and re-fashioning demonstrate multiple priorities across place and time. The materialities of fashion are shaped by global flows of cloth and beads, furs, ready-made and second-hand apparel, in dynamic processes of exchange.

Pasold Conference 2016 | 7-9 July 2016 | University of Alberta
This international conference will showcase new research on the centrality of dress in global, colonial and post-colonial engagements, emphasizing entangled histories and cross-cultural analyses.

Themes could include, but are not limited to:
  • Cross-cultural practices and patterns of dress and / or body adornment
  • Production and distribution of clothing
  • Gendered and ethnic shaping of dress practice
  • Fashion politics of dress in globalizing contexts
  • Circulation and re-use of dress and dress idioms
  • Design in globalized contexts
  • Representations of clothing cultures
  • Appropriation / acculturation of designs, materials, motifs
  • Dress in colonial / post-colonial contexts

Submission Requirements:

For individual speakers: a 200-word proposal and a 1 page CV

For full panels: a 200-word panel rationale, plus 200 word proposals for each panel participant along with their individual 1 page CVs.

We especially welcome themed panels, maximum three speakers but individuals papers are welcomed as well.

Send all submissions to: dgb.conference@ualberta.ca

Deadline for submissions: 1 October 2015.

Acceptances of papers to be announced: 1 December 2015.

Plenary Speakers:

Fashion in Qing/Early Republican China - Antonia Finnane Professor, School of Historical & Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne
Author of Changing Clothes in China: Fashion, History, Nation

Cultures of Dress within Global Africa - Karen Tranberg HansenProfessor Emerita. Department of Anthropology, Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences, Northwestern University
Author of Salaula: The World of Secondhand Clothing and Zambia

Colonial practice, cross-cultural influences in the dress of colonial Spanish America - Dana LeibsohnPriscilla Paine Van der Poel Professor of Art, Department of Art, Smith College

Principal Organizers:
Beverly Lemire, Department of History & Classics, University of Alberta lemire@ualberta.ca
Giorgio Riello, Department of History and Director, Institute of Advanced Studies, University of Warwick pasold.research@warwick.ac.uk

For further information please refer to http://www.dressingglobalbodies.com

CALL FOR PAPERS: IARHS and the IMC 2016: "Food, Feast, and Famine."

Leeds, 4-7 July 2016

The International Association for Robin Hood Studies is proposing two sessions for next year's Leeds, whose conference theme is "Food, Feast, and Famine."

Leeds will only consider fully formed sessions. Please send 300-word abstracts for either proposed session by 15 September 2015 to Lesley A. Coote (L.A.Coote@hull.ac.uk) AND Kristin Bovaird-Abbo (Kristin.BovairdAbbo@unco.edu).

"Food and Feast in Medieval Outlaw Texts"
The romances of medieval England are full of scenes of feasting and eating. Food, its preparation, and its consumption are present as central points of human interaction, community, and fellowship, providing opportunities to examine and analyze agricultural and mercantile practices as well as trade, economics, and the social standing of its producers and consumers; and feast scenes perform a wide variety of functions, serving as a cultural repository of manners and behaviors, a catalyst for the adventure, a “cute-meet” for the lovers, a moment of regrouping and redirecting the narrative, a testing ground for the chivalric and courteous skills of the attendees, an occasion on which some important revelation is made, and a culminating moment of narrative resolution, for instance. But what about in medieval outlaw tales? How important are food and feasting in the tales of Robin Hood, Gamelyn, Hereward the Wake, Eustache the Monk, and Fouke le Fitz Waryn, for example? This session will consider the presence and function of food and feast in medieval outlaw tales, with an eye to considering whether and how instances of food preparation and eating in these tales can be said to display, to develop, or to subvert the conventional ideas of community and fellowship most commonly associated with foods and feasts in secular medieval literature.

"Ecocritical Outlaws"
At an ICMS session in 2015, a panel posed the question "What Can Medieval Studies Bring to Ecocriticism?" Although the responses were diverse, none touched on the specific subgenre of outlaw literature, and this absence is reflected in much of the published ecocriticism scholarship. This panel seeks to initiate conversations about ecocritical issues in various outlaw tales, including but not limited to Robin Hood, Gamelyn, Fouke Fitz Waryn, and Án Bow-Bender. Given the liminal spaces which these tales occupy, as well as their frequent movements from greenwood into urban spaces, these tales are rich for ecological study. What do these stories reveal about medieval forest practices or perspectives towards animals (and their relationships and/or kinships to humans)? To what extent do these tales critique medieval ecological beliefs or offer alternative perspectives (that is, do they reveal a plurality of attitudes towards nature co-existing during the medieval period)? Given that Rebecca Douglass, in “Ecocriticism and Middle English Literature,” argues that “[E]cocriticism is . . . informed by a desire to understand past and present connections between literature and human attitudes regarding the earth,” what does the study of medieval outlaw tales offer to ecocritical studies? This panel welcomes a variety of approaches, including ecofeminist perspectives, cultural ecology, deep ecology, animal studies, ecolinguistics, and other innovative approaches.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Early Medieval Graphicacy in a Comparative Perspective

International Conference: Early Medieval Graphicacy in a Comparative Perspective
University of Oslo, Blindern, Oslo
9–10 June, 2016

Conference Website

Organizers: Prof. Ildar Garipzanov and Dr Romy Wyche

This conference is the last of a series for the Graphicacy and Authority in Early Medieval Europe Project. The aim of the project has been to gather scholars from a wide range of disciplines to discuss the increasing role of non-figural graphic devices across a wide range of media, from manuscripts to architecture and mass-produced objects.

Visual communication in Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages is conventionally analysed using methods specific to either figural imagery (and visualcy of the past) or literary productions (and literacy). In contrast, our project focuses on non-figural graphic devices which are intermediaries between texts and pictures, and which appear during Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages. The project operates with a working hypothesis that these graphic compositions attest to early graphicacy, which has been defined as a visual mode of communication of conceptual information and abstract ideas by means of non-figural graphic devices, which may comprise inscribed letters, words, or decorative symbols. For a recent discussion of early graphicacy, click here and for more information about the project, please visit our website.

Our previous conferences have examined functions and contextual usage of graphic devices such as monograms, christograms, the staurogram, the sign of the cross and symbolic ornaments on a wide array of material as well as the monogrammatic and decorated initials, graphic symbols, and ornamental designs that appear in early medieval manuscripts. In this closing conference, we would like to include early non-figural graphic devices that are more familiar to specialists in modern graphicacy, namely maps and diagrams.

The objective of this conference is to gather scholars from a wide range of disciplines including but not limited to art history, archaeology and cultural history of Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages in the Latin West and Greek East for comparative discussions of early non-figural graphic devices in different media, regions, or chronological periods. We are especially interested in papers dealing with different forms of early graphicacy in a comparative perspective as well as common cognitive mechanisms that enable their deployment in visual communication.

Please submit your proposal (about 300 words) and a short academic CV (no more than a page) at the following link by 1 October, 2015. Places are limited to allow us to subsidise some costs, including registration fee and refreshments. If you have any question please contact Dr Romy Wyche at r.m.wyche@iakh.uio.no.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Shakespeare in the North

Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK
2 June 2016

Keynote speakers: 
Professor Lisa Hopkins (Sheffield Hallam)
Professor Richard Wilson (Kingston)
Professor Peter Davidson (Aberdeen)

The four-hundredth anniversary of Shakespeare’s death in 2016 will, more than ever, focus attention on this question: where and to whom does Shakespeare belong? Much critical work has been done on Shakespeare’s global reach and ‘travels’, especially in relation to processes of colonisation and postcolonial emancipation. Through this work, Shakespeare has been shown to be ‘local’ to many environments across the globe, however problematically. Equally, thinking about Shakespeare’s role in, and appropriation and construction by the various, conflicted, diasporic, devolving and devolved communities of the British Isles has become a critical orthodoxy. Yet what of Shakespeare’s position in locations which, while not seeking independence or devolution through political means, retain a strong sense of being different and separate from official (privileged) strands of national culture? Because they do not fall neatly into the categories of either the ‘nation’ or the ‘colony’, these locations and their engagement with Shakespeare can become invisible and critically neglected. This neglect corresponds with such locations’ perceived and actual socio-political distance from sites of cultural and political power.

We therefore welcome 200-word abstracts for 20-minute papers that might address the following questions or related topics:
  • As we approach another moment of significant reflection on Shakespeare’s place in the world, can and should we speak of ‘Shakespeare in the North’?
  • When we say the ‘North’ where do we mean? What are the North’s edges and boundaries? How does addressing questions like these affect perceptions and uses of culturally central figures like Shakespeare?
  • How can we extend our understanding of the tensions involved in seeing Shakespeare as a ‘universal’ writer and seeing him as a property of a particular nation, to a micro-level of regional reception, reinvention, and appropriation?
  • In what ways has Shakespeare been appropriated in the ‘North’ of England, Scotland and Northern Ireland? What effects has this appropriation had on Shakespeare and the regions of the ‘North’?
  • How, for example, do Barrie Rutter’s Northern Broadsides challenge understandings of ‘metropolitan’ Shakespeare?
  • What might the function and history of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s annual visits to Newcastle upon Tyne tell us about the role of professional (and amateur) Shakespearean theatre in provincial locations?
  • In a political climate in which Northern territories actively query notions of ‘British unity’ (in both Scotland and Northern Ireland), what relevance might Shakespeare have to ‘Northern’ political autonomies?
  • What theoretical frameworks might be applicable to understanding ‘regional’ or local Shakespeares?
  • What is at stake in the scholarship surrounding the biographical and religious controversies surrounding Shakespeare’s ‘time’ in the ‘North’?
  • How did Shakespeare and his contemporaries demarcate and perceive the ‘North’ and Northern-ness?

Please submit abstracts to Adam Hansen by 1 January 2016 (adam.hansen@northumbria.ac.uk).

CALL FOR PAPERS: International Congress on Medieval Studies 2016, Special Session: Medieval Settlement and Landscape in Modern Ireland & Britain

Deadline: 1 September 2015

The 51st International Congress on Medieval Studies takes place May 12-15, 2016.
Proposals are invited for 15 to 20-minute papers from any field or theoretical approach relating to medieval settlement and landscapes. Potential papers can relate to any of the issues made in the CFP below, or may consider a related topic. Please send abstracts of around 300 words and a brief bio to session organizer Vicky McAlister, Southeast Missouri State University, vmcalister@semo.edu by Sept. 1, 2015.

Probably the most striking aspect of the proposed paper session is its inherently interdisciplinary composition. Medieval settlement and landscape studies have combined theories and techniques from a variety of disciplines, most overtly those of history, archaeology and geography. A significant question tackled by this session therefore is: How do these intellectual approaches inform one another? Ireland and Britain is a neat geographical concentration, with their intertwined histories, but also in terms of historiography. Papers that can make links, however, between Ireland and Britain and the outside world are encouraged. Implicit in the session title is the issue of context. Settlement and landscape studies often take a ‘bottom up’ approach to look at the impact wide sections of medieval society had on their physical context. They provide necessary background upon which to contextualise events and changes from the middle ages. This session will also discuss new technologies for studying the middle ages. In particular, the contributions of GIS and LIDAR to our understanding of the historic landscape could be discussed. At the same time, technical jargon should be avoided so as to make the session as relevant to as many scholars as possible. Finally, as stated in the session title, the papers will consider the place of medieval landscapes in the modern world. Heritage preservation is an issue for all practitioners in the field. On the flip side, it provides a means of interaction with the public. Presenters will be urged to consider this positioning of the medieval within the modern.

Further details will be published at http://wmich.edu/medieval/congress/

The congress is an annual gathering of around 3,000 scholars interested in medieval studies. It features more than 550 sessions of papers, panel discussions, roundtables, workshops, and performances. There are also some 90 business meetings and receptions sponsored by learned societies, associations, and institutions. The exhibits hall boasts nearly 70 exhibitors, including publishers, used book dealers, and purveyors of medieval sundries. The congress lasts three and a half days, extending from Thursday morning until Sunday at noon.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Shakespeare's Male and Female: Plays with Two Names

Hartford March 17-20 2016, North East Modern Language Association (NEMLA)

Individually or serially, Romeo and Juliet, Troilus and Cressida, and Antony and Cleopatra present opportunities to engage a range of critical concerns. The double protagonists in the titles foreground gender questions, however. Ladies are not first in the sequence of names, but whether or not they may be said to be first in the action of the plays is the question that this panel seeks to consider. Treating the plays individually or as a sequence, the panel welcomes papers that investigate the masculine/feminine divide. Such investigation can take any number of different approaches: whose agency is privileged in Romeo (or either of the two other plays, or in the sequence of all three plays); does the presentation of gender change from the early tragedy to the "problem comedy" to the late tragedy; are there pedagogical strategies that serve to highlight the deployment of gender in the plays; does genre play a role in the presentation of gender in these plays or in these plays by comparison to other plays, Romeo in light of Dream, for instance, or Antony by contrast to other Roman plays, or Troilus in the context of the problem comedies. So long as the masculine/feminine divide remains the focus of the paper, any and all approaches to the play(s) are welcome.

contact email: acacicedo@albright.edu

CALL FOR PAPERS: The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Sight and Visual Perception

University College Dublin, 11–12 March 2016

Proposals for papers are invited for The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Sight and Visual Perception, which aims to provide an international and interdisciplinary forum for researchers with an interest in the history of the senses in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

The history of the senses is a rapidly expanding field of research. Pioneered in Early Modern and Modern studies, it is now attracting attention also from Medieval and Renaissance specialists. Preoccupation with the human senses and with divine control over them is evident in a range of narrative texts, scientific treatises, creative literature, as well as the visual arts and music from the pre-modern period. This conference – the first in a series devoted to the five senses – aims to contribute to this expansion by bringing together leading researchers to exchange ideas and approaches.

The theme of the inaugural meeting is ‘Sight and Visual Perception’. Sight has been chosen as the first topic for investigation as it was considered the primary sense and was treated as an abstract philosophical and religious concept in many medieval texts. But the study of sight can also provide insights into various aspects of medieval society: ‘eye-witness’ descriptions; sight impairment and the care of the blind; deprivation of sight as punishment or revenge; the development of spectacles and other optical aids; ideas about colours and their significance; ‘second sight’ as manifested in visions and apparitions; the concept of ‘the gaze’ in visual arts. The conference aims to address these and other themes and to foster interaction between established and younger scholars working in the area.

Keynote Speakers:
Professor Elizabeth Robertson, University of Glasgow
Professor Chris Woolgar, University of Southampton

Professor Robertson’s research and publications are concerned with vernacular theology, medieval poetics, literacy in the Middle Ages, and gender and religion in Middle English literature. Her recent work has focused on vision and touch in devotional literature. With J. Jahner she edited Medieval and Early Modern Devotional Objects in Global Perspective: Translations of the Sacred for theNew Middle Ages series (Palgrave MacMillan, 2010). This collection contains her important paper, ‘Julian of Norwich’s Unmediated Vision’.

Professor Woolgar’s research and publications are concerned with the social and economic history of late-medieval England and in particular with the evidence contained in domestic household accounts. He is the author of The Senses in Late Medieval England (Yale, 2007) and co-author of A Cultural History of the Senses in the Middle Ages, 500–1450, ed. Richard Newhauser (Bloomsbury Academic, 2014).

Contributions on any aspect of the conference theme of ‘Sight and Visual Perception’ are welcomed from established and early career scholars as well as postgraduates. Proposals for panels are also warmly encouraged. Titles and abstracts (maximum 300 words) together with a short biography, institutional affiliation and contact details, should be forwarded to medrenforum@gmail.comby 8 November 2015.

The conference is organised by Edward Coleman, School of History, UCD and the Forum for Medieval and Renaissance Studies in Ireland. It is generously supported by UCD Seed Funding.

Organizing Committee:
Dr Edward Coleman (University College Dublin)
Dr Ann Buckley (Queen’s University Belfast / Trinity College Dublin)
Dr Carrie Griffin (University of Bristol)
Dr Emer Purcell (University College Cork)

Forum for Medieval and Renaissance Studies in Ireland (FMRSI)
Web: www.fmrsi.wordpress.comEmail: medrenforum@gmail.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ForumMRSI
Twitter: @FMRSI

Workshop: Before Montucla: Historiography of Science in the Early Modern Era

Interdisciplinary Centre for Science and Technology Studies,
Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Germany, March 3/4, 2016

During the last decades many new topics, approaches and research agendas emerged in historiography of science. The field extricated itself from descriptive positivism and celebratory Whiggism and began to take account of the various contexts of historical writings, creatively combining methods of the humanities and the social sciences with knowledge of the sciences. Historiography of science, however, still lacks evaluation and interpretation of its own history. In other words, the history of historiography of science has not been written yet. General overviews of the origins of history of science as a discipline usually go back to the end of the 19th century but historiography of science is much older. Some scholars say that it began in classical antiquity, among pupils of Aristotle. Other authors argue that the discipline originated in the efforts of early modern scientists to convey legitimacy and nobility to their field. Other authors argue that historiography of science arose in the Enlightenment in close relation to the study of the history of the human spirit. Every attempt to seriously study the history of historiography of science must therefore start with finding out when the moment came in which historiography of science emerged as a discipline with its own themes, specifics methods and supporting institutions. We assume that historiography of science originated in the early modern period because at that time "science" in the modern meaning of the word emerged - and in order to be recognized as a producer of knowledge worth of knowing it had to offer its impressive pedigree. But still there are a lot of questions concerning the origins, aims, functions and methods used in the first outlines of the history of science.

The workshop wants to address these gaps in our knowledge. We welcome all contributions that relate to the history of historiography of science especially in the period from the Renaissance to the beginning of the 19th century. We want to examine how the perception of the history of science was influenced by philosophical assumptions, mainly by philosophy of history: e. g. did scientists and historians view the history of science as a linear accumulation of knowledge or as a cyclical process in which periods of blossom and barbarism alternated? We are interested in how the themes of contemporary general historiography, including chronology or biblical history, affected the outlines of the history of science. Did scientists and historians synchronize the history of science with the political and socio-economic events (as in the Marxist historiography)? What factors were recognized as decisive in the development of science? Further, we are interested in the role of mythological and religious strategies in promoting particular points of view on the history of science. We are interested in nationalist, racist and religious prejudices that influenced different forms of interpretation of the history of science. We welcome papers that relate to the iconography of the historiography of science and various ways of graphical representations of and in the history of science. The literary strategies of early historians of science are an interesting problem as well. We want to discuss key concepts of the historical forms of historiography of science: the changing ideas of scientific progress, of history, of science; emancipation from prejudices, tradition, cumulativism etc. We are also interested in what scientists and historians expected of their historical overviews of the development of science, i.e.: what were the functions of historiography of science? What kind of transformations can be seen, especially in the period from 16th to the early 19th century? Who were the supposed (and real) addressees of such historical accounts. What was the public for which the outlines of the history of science had been prepared? And what effect and impact was expected?

The workshop is being organized at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Science and Technology Studies (IZWT) at the Bergische Universität Wuppertal. For further information on the topic, please get in touch with Volker Remmert, remmert@uni-wuppertal.de; or Daniel Spelda spelda@kfi.zcu.cz. The workshop's ambit invites interdisciplinary collaboration. Proposals for papers from all who can contribute to the topic are therefore welcome. Special consideration will be given to proposals from young scholars. The language of the workshop will be English. Submissions must include a title, an abstract (1-2 pages) of a 20 minute presentation, and a short CV (maximum one page). Submissions should be sent to Volker Remmert at remmert@uni-wuppertal.de no later than July 18, 2015. Contributors' overnight accommodation costs will be covered. But because funds are limited, please let us know well in advance if you will need support to cover travelling expenses.

Volker Remmert (Wuppertal), Daniel Spelda (Pilsen)

CALL FOR PAPERS: Adaptation and Dance


Dance productions frequently draw on artistic precedents. Ballet companies rely on classics based on fairy and folk tales but audiences also enjoy an expanding repertoire of works based on a broader range of sources: art – The Green Table, The Rake’s Progress, A Simple Man; the Bible – Job, The Judas Tree, The Prodigal Son; film – Edward Scissorhands; biography – Anastasia, Fall River Legend, Mayerling; children’s literature – The Tales of Beatrix Potter; novels – Anna Karenina, The Great Gatsby, Manon, Woolf Works; operas – The Car Man, Madame Butterfly; plays – Edward II, Hobson’s Choice; poetry – Images of Love. Shakespeare has provided inspiration for a large number of dance-makers. These examples signal how across several decades choreographers working globally with a range of companies have produced one-act and full-length pieces for stage and screen.

In recent years there has been growing interest in the analysis of a range of topics connected with adaptation and dance. By bringing together scholars and practitioners, this one-day conference seeks to move away from the dominant focus on film and television in Adaptation Studies and consider the neglected area of dance. Papers are invited on topics related, but not limited, to:
  • Fairy and folk tale ballet adaptations
  • The history of ballet adaptations
  • Modern dance and classical ballet interpretations of literary works
  • Key choreographers as adaptors
  • The idea of the choreographer as ‘auteur’
  • Dance adaptations of novels and poems
  • Stardom, celebrity and dance adaptations
  • Shakespeare and ballet
  • Genres of dance adaptation
  • The theoretical underpinnings of Adaptation Studies in relation to dance

It is hoped that selected papers will form an edited collection. Proposals (between 50–100 words) and a brief biographical note should be sent to Elinor Parsons (eparsons@dmu.ac.uk) and Hila Shachar (hila.shachar@dmu.ac.uk) by 6 November 2015.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Netherlandish Art and Luxury Goods in Renaissance Spain Trade, Patronage and Consumption

University of Leuven, Belgium, 4-6 February 2016
International conference

Initiated and organized by
Illuminare – Centre for the Study of Medieval Art | KU Leuven

In 2010, Illuminare – Centre for the Study of Medieval Art (KU Leuven) acquired the archive of the eminent Belgian art historian professor Jan Karel Steppe (1918-2009). Steppe is internationally renowned for his groundbreaking research on the influx of Netherlandish art and luxury goods in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Spain. By springtime 2016, his documentation will be archived and the inventory made accessible online. To celebrate this accomplishment, Illuminare is organizing an international conference on Steppe’s long-term and much loved research topic.

This conference will focus on a large variety of media, ranging from painting and tapestry to broadcloth and astrolabes. Special attention will be paid to the driving forces behind this export-driven market, such as artists, patrons, collectors and merchants. By taking into account cultural, religious, political and socio-economic dynamics, this conference aims to shed new light on the multifaceted artistic impact of the Low Countries on the Iberian Peninsula in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

We welcome 20-minute papers by established and early career scholars that revisit or expand Steppe’s topics of research and, equally important, enhance these with recent methodologies and theoretical frameworks. The official language of the conference is English, although papers in French might be taken into consideration. Proposals of no more than 300 words and a brief CV should be submitted to drs. Robrecht Janssen (robrecht.janssen@arts.kuleuven.be) and drs. Daan van Heesch (daan.vanheesch@arts.kuleuven.be) by the 1st of October 2015. Speakers will be invited to submit their papers for a peer-reviewed publication on the topic.

Scientific committee:
Barbara Baert (KU Leuven), Krista de Jonge (KU Leuven), Bart Fransen (KIK-IRPA, Brussels), Robrecht Janssen (KU Leuven / KIK-IRPA, Brussels), Maximiliaan Martens (Ghent University), Werner Thomas (KU Leuven), Paul Vandenbroeck (Royal Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp / KU Leuven), Jan Van der Stock (KU Leuven), Daan van Heesch (KU Leuven), Koenraad Van Cleempoel (Hasselt University), Annelies Vogels (KU Leuven), Lieve Watteeuw (KU Leuven)

For more information, please visit the conference website: https://netherlandishartinspain.wordpress.com/ 



CALL FOR PAPERS: Art and Articulation

8-9th January 2016, St Hilda's College, Oxford

The relationship between word and image, and the ways in which medieval art (be it visual, textual, or both) operates as a means of expressing the inexpressible, will be explored in a two-day conference held in Oxford under the auspice of the Mystical Theology Network.

This interdisciplinary conference will bring together theologians, art historians, and literary scholars to examine the ways in which various forms of artistic expression have been and can be used to articulate the mystical or that which cannot easily be spoken. The principal focus will be art and articulation in medieval works and modern responses to them.

The conference will investigate the role of art and its connection to forms of mystical knowing through various strands. From visual art, through optics, apophasis and ekphrasis to mystical theology, this multidisciplinary approach to illumination will shed new light on the role of art in mystical contemplation.

Keynote Speakers:

Barbara Baert, Professor of Art History, KU Leuven.
Inigo Bocken, Director of the Titus Brandsma Instituut for the Study of Spirituality, Radboud University of Nijmegen.
Sheila Gallagher, Artist, and Associate Professor of Fine Arts, Boston College
Vincent Gillespie, J.R.R. Tolkien Professor of English Literature and Language, University of Oxford.
Catherine Karkov, Professor of Art History, University of Leeds.
Michael Kuczynski, Associate Professor of English, Tulane University.
Bernard McGinn, Naomi Shenstone Donnelley Professor Emeritus of Historical Theology and of the History of Christianity, University of Chicago.
William Prosser, Artist and Fellow of the Centre for Christianity and Culture, Regent’s Park College, Oxford.

We welcome submissions for 20-minute papers and proposals for sessions of three 20-minute papers.

Topics may include, but are by no means confined to:
  • The interplay between mysticism and art, both visual and textual.
  • Art (visual, textual or both) as a means of communicating that which is hard to articulate.
  • Apophasis.
  • Theorisations of art and beauty and how these relate to notions of mysticism.
  • Transformative visions and the therapeutic effect of ‘seeing as’.
  • Medieval and modern ideas on optics, seeing and contemplation/mysticism.
  • The intersection between visual and textual art.
  • The role of illuminations and annotations in medieval manuscripts.
  • Ekphrasis.
Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words to the conference organisers by 1st September 2015.

We warmly welcome papers from graduate students.

We also warmly welcome contributions from artists outside of academia. For more information about contributing as an artist please contact Tom de Freston

For further information please refer to https://artandarticulationconference.wordpress.com


CALL FOR PAPERS: Gender and Emotion

Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2016
The University of Hull

6th – 8th January 2016

The grief-stricken faces at Edward’s deathbed in the Bayeux Tapestry; the ambiguous ‘ofermod’ in The Battle of Maldon; the body-crumpling anguish of the Virgin witnessing the Man of Sorrows; the mirth of the Green Knight; the apoplectic anger of the mystery plays’ Herod and the visceral visionary experiences of Margery of Kempe all testify to the ways in which the medieval world sought to express, perform, idealise and understand emotion.

Yet while such expressions of emotion are frequently encountered by medievalists working across the disciplines, defining, quantifying and analysing the purposes of emotion and its relationship to gender often proves difficult. Are personal items placed in early Anglo Saxon graves a means for the living to let go of, or perpetuate emotion, and how are these influenced by the body in the grave? Do different literary and historical forms lend themselves to diverse ways of expressing men’s and women’s emotion? How does a character expressing emotion on stage or in artwork use body, gender and articulation to communicate emotion to their viewer? Moreover, is emotion viewed differently depending on the gendered identity of the body expressing it? Is emotion and its reception used to construct, deconstruct, challenge or confirm gender identities?

This conference seeks to explore the manifestations, performances and functions of emotion in the early to late Middle Ages, and to examine the ways in which emotion is gendered and used to construct gender identities.

Proposals are now being accepted for 20 minute papers. Topics to consider may include, but are not limited to:
  • Gender and emotional expression: representing and performing emotion
  • The emotional body
  • Philosophies of emotion: theory and morality
  • Emotional objects and vessels of emotion
  • Language and emotion and the languages of emotion
  • Preserving or perpetuating emotion
  • Emotions to be dealt with: repressing, curtailing, channelling, transforming
  • Forbidden emotion
  • Living through (someone else’s) emotion
  • The emotions of war and peace
  • The emotive ‘other’
  • Place and emotion
  • Queer emotion

We welcome scholars from a range of disciplines, including history, literature, art history, archaeology and drama. A travel fund is available for postgraduate students who would otherwise be unable to attend.

Please email proposals of no more than 300 words to organiser Daisy Black at d.black@hull.ac.uk by the 7th September 2015. All queries should also be directed to this address. Please also include biographical information detailing your name, research area, institution and level of study (if applicable).

CALL FOR PAPERS: Framing the Face: New perspectives on the history of facial hair

One-day workshop, 28 November 2015
Friend’s Meeting House, Euston Road, London

Over the past five centuries, facial hair has been central to debates about masculinity. Over time, changing views of masculinity, self-fashioning, the body, gender, sexuality and culture have all strongly influenced men’s decisions to wear, or not wear, facial hair. For British Tudor men, beards were a symbol of sexual maturity and prowess. Throughout the early modern period, debates also raged about the place of facial hair within a humoural medical framework. The eighteenth century, by contrast, saw beards as unrefined and uncouth; clean-shaven faces reflected enlightened values of neatness and elegance, and razors were linked to new technologies. Victorians conceived of facial hair in terms of the natural primacy of men, and new models of hirsute manliness. All manner of other factors from religion to celebrity culture have intervened to shape decisions about facial hair and shaving.

And yet, despite a recent growth in interest in the subject, we still know little about the significance, context and meanings of beards and moustaches through time, or of its relationship to important factors such as medicine and medical practice, technology and shifting models of masculinity. We therefore welcome papers related to, but by no means limited to the following questions:

  • To what extent were beards a symbol of masculinity and what key attributes of masculinity did they symbolise? 
  • To what extent did the profession of the barber influence beard styles and the management of facial hair? 
  • To what extent were beard trends led by the elite and by metropolitan fashion? 
  • How far did provincial trends influence metropolitan trends through migration? 
  • What impact did changing shaving technologies have on beard fashions/trends?
  • How were beards understood within the medical frameworks of different eras? 
  • How have women responded to facial hair in different eras? 
  • How has the display of facial hair by women been viewed as both a medical and cultural phenomena?

Please send abstracts of up to 300 words, by 30th September 2015, to framingtheface@gmail.com

For further information please contact the organisers
Dr Alun Withey, University of Exeter A.Withey@exeter.ac.uk
Dr Jennifer Evans, University of Hertfordshire J.evans5@herts.ac.uk

https://framingtheface.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

Exploring Early Modern Dress: The Merits and Challenges of Diverse Sources


Inaugural Dressing The Early Modern Network Conference

The field of early modern dress history draws from a variety of sources in order to map out fashions and trends within the confines of readily available early modern source materials. The analysis of a vast range of sources is done in the context of an interdisciplinary research where different research fields and schools of thought collide and emerge in the form of dress history. Pictorial representations of early modern dress together with surviving garments, garment fragments and textiles form some of the obvious tools from which information is drawn and pieced together. Archival sources, including house inventories, account books and sumptuary legislation, among others, have also consistently been employed to verify the various types of garments used in the early modern period. However, while each of these sources have their definite merits, they also pose considerable challenges due to the fact that they can sometimes be fragmented. The conference aims to generate a discussion about the benefits and advantages, as well as the limitations and constraints that the plethora of these diverse sources pose in order to build a solid platform from which researchers can draw conclusions about early modern dress history.

Saturday, 19 September 2015, Dutch University Institute for Art History (NIKI), Viale Torricelli 5, 50125 Florence, Italy (www.niki-florence.org)

PhD students and early career researchers are invited to speak about their experiences in relation to the sources that they use, with reference to their current or previous projects. We invite potential speakers to submit as a single document: (1) a 300-word paper abstract, which should include the main question of the research project, (2) a paper title, (3) a brief curriculum vitae, (4) institutional affiliations and (5) contact information to the Dressing the Early Modern Network at info@dressingtheearlymodern.com

Each speaker will be allotted twenty minutes. The deadline for submissions is 30 May 2015. Notification of the outcome will be advised by e-mail on or before 15 June 2015.

Please note that funding is not provided for this event, so participants will be required to fund and arrange their own travel and accommodations.

www.dressingtheearlymodern.com

CALL FOR PAPERS: The Early Modern Line: A Symposium

Friday 18th September 2015 - Brotherton Library, University of Leeds

The Early Modern Lines Research Network is hosting a discursive symposium with keynote presentations from Dr Matthew Eddy (Durham University), Matthias Garn, Master Mason, and carver Kibby Schaefer, alongside an exhibition of items from the Library’s Special Collections.

We invite proposals for 10-minute lightning papers on any topic considering the ‘early modern line’, conceived of in the broadest possible sense. Papers should be designed to provoke discussion, raise problems, puzzle out ideas and ask questions rather than provide answers, and should present work in progress rather than polished research.

Abstracts should be 150–200 words, outlining some of the main points you wish to discuss. Please email them - or any queries you might have - to earlymodernlines@york.ac.uk by Monday 10th August 2015. Travel bursaries, generously provided by the White Rose College of the Arts and Humanities, are available to all postgraduate students attending the symposium. Please indicate in your email if you would like to be considered for a bursary .

Topics for papers might include, but are not limited to:
  • Lines as organisational technologies; e.g. tables, diagrams and brackets
  • The importance of the line in scientific, philosophical and mathematical disciplines
  • Architectural and artistic lines
  • Poetic lines
  • Framing devices in early modern books
  • Conceptual, metaphorical or figural lines
  • Genealogical lines
  • The line in three dimensions
  • Cartography, trade and travel routes
  • The line in military strategy
  • Chronological lines and histories
  • Decorative lines and pattern
  • Folds, cuts, tears and creases
  • Typography
  • Plotlines
  • Weaving, stitching and knitting
  • Lines of influence
  • Applying modern theories to early modern lines

International conference ‘Art and Science in the Early Modern Low Countries (ca 1560-1730)’

https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/nl/art-and-science

Amsterdam, September 17 (Rijksmuseum) and 18 (Trippenhuis), 2015
Registration deadline: September 14, 2015

On September 17 and 18, 2015, Amsterdam is to host the conference ‘Art and Science in the Early Modern Low Countries (ca 1560-1730)’, organized by the Rijksmuseum and the Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands.

Prior to the eighteenth century, ‘art’ and ‘science’ were often considered complementary, rather than opposite, expressions of human culture. They enlightened one another: through comparable curiosity, knowledge and observation of the world, but also in their resulting products: paintings, prints, books, maps, anatomical preservations, life casts, and many others. Scholars, craftsmen and artists often engaged in observing and representing nature, in close cooperation.

During the sixteenth and seventeenth century, it was the Low Countries that emerged as a center of artistic and scientific innovation and creativity, and as central points in the exchange of goods, knowledge and skill. It is certainly no coincidence that the outburst of artistic productivity in the Netherlands, both the South and the North, coincided with the ‘Scientific Revolution’.

The conference ‘Art and Science in the Early Modern Low Countries’ wants to contribute to the dialogue between experts in the history of art, historians of science, and all those interested in the visual and material culture of the sixteenth and seventeenth-century Netherlands. The conference focuses on historical objects, images, works or art or texts that represent the combination of art and science, and looks at their origin and intended audience. Sessions are, amongst others, devoted to the culture of collecting; modes of representing living nature; the influence of new optical devices on the arts; and the impact of travels abroad on representations of the world.

Although the emphasis of the conference will be on the Low Countries, both the South and the North, several contributions also include developments elsewhere in Europe. This way, it hopes to offer a broad overview of the way in which art and science came together in the early modern Low Countries.

Keynote Speakers:
· Pamela H. Smith, Columbia University, New York
· Alexander Marr, University of Cambridge

Organizing committee:
Eric Jorink and Ilja Nieuwland (Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands, The Hague), Jan de Hond, Gregor Weber, Gijs van der Ham and Pieter Roelofs (Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam)

Scientific committee:
Joanna Woodall (The Courtauld Institute of Art, London), Karin Leonhard (Universität Konstanz), Tim Huisman (Museum Boerhaave Leiden)

Venues:
The first day of the conference (September 17) takes place in the Rijksmuseum, the second day (September 18) in the Trippenhuis (Seat of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences), both in Amsterdam.

Program:
For a tentative program please consult: https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/nl/art-and-science

Admission and registration:
€ 95 (both days); Students: € 45.
Register at: https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/nl/art-and-science

For more information:
Ilja Nieuwland, ilja.nieuwland@huygens.knaw.nl