'Love & the Word' – AULLA Conference 2016

Hosted by Victoria University, the Australasian Universities Languages & Literature Association Conference will be held in Melbourne, Australia from 7th-9th December 2016.

The conference theme draws on AULLA’s origins as an association of scholars working in fields of philology. Thus we examine both philos (love) and logos (word). How does affection affect words? What do people mean by ‘love’ and its counterparts in the world’s languages? Or perhaps: how does it ‘do’ those meanings?

We encourage papers with a focus on engaged studies and discussions of teaching practice and of critical/exegetical responses to creative practice. Papers that respond to ‘love and the word’ in the fields of languages, the literary study of other languages, and philosophical approaches to cultural expression are expressly welcome. We also expressly welcome interdisciplinary angles on the theme, such as Cultural Studies, Indigenous Studies, Postcolonial Studies, and comparative approaches.

The organisers welcome submissions for individual presentations of 20 minutes and panel sessions of 90 minutes. Please note, submissions are due by Monday the 29 February, 2016. Submissions should include: name/s of author/s (including affiliations), title of presentation, an abstract of up to 200 words, and a biographical note of up to 50 words per author. Panel proposals should include the above for each presentation as well as a title and abstract for the session as a whole. If you would like to nominate a chair for your panel session, that would also be welcome. To submit a proposal, please visit: Call for Papers


CALL FOR PAPERS: Cultures of Mortality: Death on the Shakespearean Stage

1-3 December 2016
Shakespeare’s Globe

2016 sees the 400th anniversary of the deaths of Shakespeare, Francis Beaumont, the theatrical entrepreneur Philip Henslowe and the Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes. Globe Education is marking this memorable year with an international conference that explores death, rituals of dying and the experience of loss on the early modern stage.

This conference invites papers that explores these themes and more. It is particularly interested in:
rituals of death; artistic representation; shifting practices from Medieval to Renaissance/early modern; loss and bereavement; performativity of death- performing death on the early modern stage; commemoration: textual, artistic and dramatic; philosophical, religious and social attitudes to death and dying; wills and legacies.

Please submit a 150 word abstract/proposal tofarah.k@shakespearesglobe.com by 1st of March 2016

Farah Karim-Cooper
Head of Higher Education & Research
Globe Education
020 7902 1439

CALL FOR PAPERS: Authority Revisited: Towards Thomas More and Erasmus in 1516

Lectio International Conference 30th November - 3rd December 2016, University of Leuven, Belgium

In the year 1516, two crucial texts for the cultural history of the West saw the light: Thomas More’s Utopia and Desiderius Erasmus’s Novum Instrumentum. Both of these works dealt freely with authoritative sources of western civilization and opened new pathways of thought on the eve of invasive religious and political changes.

Lectio and the University of Leuven, in collaboration with its RefoRC-partners the Johannes a Lasco Library Emden and the Europäische Melanchthon Akademie Bretten as well as other partners, will mark the 500th birthday of both foundational texts by organizing a conference, from November 30 through December 2, 2016. The university city of Leuven is a most appropriate place to have this conference organized, since it was intimately involved in the genesis and the history of both works.

The conference will be devoted to studying not only the reception and influence of Utopia and the Novum Instrumentum in (early) modern times, but also their precursors in classical antiquity, the patristic period, and the middle ages. The conference will thus lead to a better understanding of how More and Erasmus used their sources, and it will address the more encompassing question of how these two authors, through their own ideas and their use of authoritative texts, have contributed to the rise of modern western thought.

The conference also explicitly aims at enhancing our understanding of iconographic, book-, and art-historical aspects of the transmission of the texts under consideration, both before and after the publication of the two works.

This multidisciplinary Lectio conference wants to bring together international scholars working in the field of theology, art history, philosophy, history of science and historical linguistics.


Thomas More: Utopia Revisited

More’s colorful description of the allegedly recently discovered island of Utopia was so influential as to lend its name to a literary genre. At the same time, although the name Utopia is a neologism invented in More's circle , the utopian tradition reaches back to antiquity.

Papers are invited on the following topics:

The best known examples from classical antiquity are Plato’s descriptions of the ideal state. Yet there are other instances, such as the myth of the golden age, elaborated in many different ways by numerous ancient writers. In addition, More had a thorough knowledge of the works by Greek and Roman thinkers such as Plutarch, Lucian, Cicero, and Seneca. The conference aims to map these ancient representations of the ideal state and to study the way in which More was influenced by them.

Equally influential is the Christian tradition, most prominently laid down in Augustine’s City of God, a text of central importance that marks the transition from antiquity to the middle ages. Augustine’s eschatological view of the perfect City may, for example, be the subject of contributions to the conference. By extension, the various forms of the mythical account of Cockaigne enter the picture as possible topics.

Also of direct impact on Utopia were reports about the New World (for example in the letters of Amerigo Vespucci, Christopher Columbus, or Peter Martyr of Anghiera) and the images of the New World in Europe. It would be an interesting contribution to the conference to study in which ways the discovery and description of an “unspoiled” world and its inhabitants inspired More’s views.

Renaissance humanists also influenced More’s Utopia. The most renowned example is, of course, Erasmus. But the views of other humanists, like Pico della Mirandola, also shaped More’s thought. Similarly, the scholastic tradition deserves to be studied in at this juncture. Renaissance humanism and scholasticism were difficult to reconcile, according to More, and on more than one occasion he sets one over against the other.

The conference shall also pay due attention to the reception of Utopia in early modern times, both in the vernacular and in Latin. Authors such as Tommaso Campanella, Vasco de Quiroga, Francis Bacon, Johann Eberlin, Kaspar Stiblin, and Johann Valentin Andreae may be investigated in this regard, as well as the genre of the picaresque novel.

Of particular interest are iconographic, book-, and art-historical aspects of the transmission of Utopia as well as the works of More’s predecessors.

Erasmus: The New Testament Revisited 

Erasmus’s revision of the New Testament text was groundbreaking. Obviously, however, Erasmus’s foundational work cannot be properly understood apart from his predecessors’ endeavors to translate the Bible and to comment on it, or to deal with the Bible from a text-critical perspective.

Papers are invited on the following topics:

Papers studying biblical exegesis in Christian antiquity and its reception in the works by Erasmus. More in particular, paper topics may include Jerome’s Vulgata, Origen’s Hexapla, and relevant commentaries on Scripture, such as those of Chrysostom and others. Erasmus’s recourse to classical language and culture in the Annotationes to his New Testament may also be the subject of paper proposals.

Medieval biblical exegesis: Even though self-declared pioneers like Erasmus and the Renaissance humanists were not keen to be associated with medieval biblical exegesis, this aspect of possible influences and sources cannot be neglected. The conference invites contributions on the biblical Renaissance of the twelfth century and later (among others, the Glossa ordinaria, Hugh of St. Victor and the Parisian Victorines, Peter Comestor, Peter Cantor and Stephen Langton, Hugh of St. Cher and Nicholas of Lyra). In sum, the conference aims to explore the extent to which Erasmus and his fellow humanists integrated the progress made by medieval biblical exegesis.

The link between Erasmus and Renaissance humanism, both in northern Europe (Agricola, Cornelius Gerardi Aurelius) and in Italy (Lorenzo Valla, Gianozzo Manetti). The main question is here how Erasmus’s Christian humanism did relate to the broader cultural historical current of renewed textual criticism.

The reception of Erasmus’s text-critical and exegetical work in the early modern era will be explored through the establishment of (new) authoritative version(s) of the New Testament and the debates that accompanied the process (Novum Instrumentum, Vulgata, Textus Receptus) as well as the elaboration of humanist, Protestant, and Catholic exegesis, from Luther and Melanchthon through Beza, from Dorpius, Franciscus Lucas Brugensis and Jansenius Gandavensis, via Estienne, Arias Montanus, through Maldonatus, etc. We further look forward to receiving papers on how Erasmus’ New Testament was used in the development of early modern vernacular versions, on all sides of the confessional spectrum.

Of particular interest are iconographic, book-, and art-historical aspects of the transmission of the texts, both of Erasmus’s predecessors and of Erasmus’s Novum Instrumentum.

Papers may be given in English or French and the presentation should take 20 minutes.
To submit a proposal, please send an abstract of approximately 300 words (along with your name, academic affiliation and contact information) to lectio@kuleuven.be by January 15, 2016. Notification of acceptance will be given by the end of March 2016.

The publication of selected papers is planned in a volume to be included in the peer-reviewed LECTIO Series (Brepols Publishers).

Invited speakers:Gillian Clark (University of Bristol)
Henk Jan De Jonge (Leiden University) 
Günter Frank (Europäische Melanchthon Akademie)
Brad Gregory (University of Notre Dame)
Quentin Skinner (Queen Mary University of London)

Venue: The Leuven Institute for Ireland in Europe, Janseniusstraat 1, 3000 Leuven

Organising Committee:
Erik De Bom, Anthony Dupont, Wim François, Jan Papy, Marleen Reynders, Andrea Robiglio, Violet Soen, Gerd Van Riel 

Scientific Committee:
Rita Beyers (U Antwerpen), Erik De Bom (KU Leuven), Anthony Dupont (KU Leuven), Wim François (KU Leuven), Günter Frank (Europäische Melanchthon Akademie, Bretten), Jan Papy (KU Leuven), Andrea Robiglio (KU Leuven), Herman Selderhuis (Johannes a Lasco Bibliothek, Emden), Violet Soen (KU Leuven), Gerd Van Riel (KU Leuven), Wim Verbaal (U Gent)

Contact:
Lectio KU Leuven
Faculties of Arts, Law, Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies Blijde Inkomststraat 5
3000 Leuven
BELGIUM
+32 16 328778
lectio@kuleuven.be
www.ghum.kuleuven.be/lectio



CALL FOR PAPERS: Utopia for 500 Years

A Conference on Thomas More’s Utopia to be held at St. Thomas More College, University Of Saskatchewan

22-24 September 2016, in celebration of the 500th anniversary of the work’s publication

In the five hundred years since Thomas More published his Utopia, the work has had a profound influence on political and philosophical thought. But it has likewise held an important place in modern aesthetic and cultural developments—in literature, in art, in architecture and design—and has inspired political change, social experiments, and radical countercultural movements. This conference seeks to address the varieties of utopia and utopianism that More’s work and those influenced by it have dared imagine. Does the utopian impulse mark a practical response to political, ecological or social crisis? Does utopia reflect a nostalgia for some lost golden age or optimism for a better—if perhaps impossible—future? Do utopian fictions allow us to explore previously unseen possibilities or confine us to the realm of mere imagination? What about dystopias? How are imagined dystopias informed by the tradition begun by More? Are they a straightforward antithesis of the utopian impulse, or could it be that dystopia is somehow a product of utopianism? Finally, what is the place of Utopia and utopias in historical change? Can we identify historical or modern social, economic or ecological experiments that display some utopian vision? In short, how has utopia been used as a tool to think with and how have people translated that thought into action.

We invite proposals on a range of topics that address More’s Utopia, its context, reception and influence, but also those that more broadly address the idea of utopias and utopianism in other political, philosophical, literary, social and historical contexts. We hope this conference will bring together a range of scholars working on Utopia and utopias from diverse disciplinary perspectives. Dr. Anne Prescott, Emerita Helen Goodhart Altschul Professor of English at Barnard College, will deliver a keynote address.

St. Thomas More College is a Catholic liberal arts college that is federated with the University of Saskatchewan. The College’s Shannon Library holds one of six extant copies of the 1518 second edition of More’s Utopia. Together with the Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Program and the Department of History at the University of Saskatchewan, St. Thomas More College invites proposals for individual papers or complete panels that address the conference theme. Applications for funding to cover travel costs will be made available to those whose papers are accepted. Please send proposed titles and abstracts (no longer than 300 words) by email to utopia2016@stmcollege.ca by 8 January 2016.

For conference updates, follow the blog of the Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance Studies program at the University of Saskatchewan.

On Twitter @CMRSatUSask #Utopia2016

Dr. Brent Nelson, Professor
Director, Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance Studies
Department of English
9 Campus Dr.
University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A5
ph.: (306) 966-1820
fax.: (306) 966-5951


CALL FOR PAPERS: The Afterlives of Eve

9-11 September 2016 at Newcastle University and Durham University

Keynotes: Sandra M. Gilbert (UC Davis), Wendy Furman-Adams (Whittier), John Bothwell (Durham) 

From Genesis to mitochondrial Eve, the idea of a single common foremother has occupied a crucial space in the Western cultural imaginary. Eve, whether as bringer of sin, as life-giver, as burden, curse or saviour, functions as a commentary on maternity, sexuality, creativity and power. This cross-period and interdisciplinary conference will be an opportunity to explore the impact of her varied representations through the centuries and across different genres and media. 

How has this archetypal figure been revised and revisited by conservative and radical thought? 
What personal, polemical and/or creative uses have been made of the figure of Eve?
What persists and what changes in her depictions across time and geographical space?
How have women and men negotiated their shared and different relationships to Eve?
How has Eve been appropriated, neglected or rejected as a foremother?
How does she speak to fantasies of masculine or feminine self-sufficiency?
What cultural, political, literary and/or theological spaces does she occupy now? 

Topics might include, but need not be limited to: 
  • Origins of/Sources for Eve 
  • Other Eves 
  • The absence of Eve 
  • Representations and Transformations of Eve 
  • Eve as Over-reacher 

We welcome papers from all disciplines in arts, humanities and sciences and covering any historical period. We also welcome panel proposals including PGR panel proposals. Titles and abstracts of no more than 250 words per speaker should be sent to Ruth Connolly (ruth.connolly@ncl.ac.uk) and Mandy Green (mandy.green@durham.ac.uk) by 12 March 2016. 

Panel proposals should also include a title for the panel's programme. Speakers will be notified by March 21st. We gratefully acknowledge support from MEMS at Newcastle, IMEMS Durham and Newcastle University's Academic Conference Fund. A limited number of PGR bursaries may be available. Please indicate when sending your abstract whether you would like to be considered for a bursary.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Shakespearean Transformations: Death, Life, and Afterlives

7th Biennial British Shakespeare Association Conference

University of Hull, 8-11 September 2016
www.hull.ac.uk/bsa2016

Keynote speakers:
Susan Bassnett (University of Warwick)
Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex)
Michael Neill (University of Auckland)
Claudia Olk (Free University of Berlin)
Barrie Rutter (Northern Broadsides)
Tiffany Stern (University of Oxford)
Richard Wilson (Kingston University)

‘Remember me!’ commands the ghost of Hamlet’s father at a moment in English history when the very purpose of remembrance of the dead was being transformed. How does the past haunt the present in Shakespeare? What do Shakespeare’s works reveal about the processes of mourning and remembrance? Shakespeare breathed new life into ‘old tales’: how do his acts of literary resuscitation transform the material he revived and what it signifies? This major international conference will investigate the ways in which Shakespeare remembered the past and we remember Shakespeare.

The 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death offers us a timely opportunity to reflect upon the continuation of his life and art diachronically, spatially from the Globe across the globe, and materially on stage, page, canvas, music score, and screen. How does Shakespeare continue to haunt us? The second strand of the conference focuses on Shakespeare’s literary, dramatic, and transcultural afterlives. The conference thus also seeks to explore the various ways in which Shakespeare’s ghost has been invoked, summoned up, or warded off over the past four centuries.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:
  • Shakespearean transformations: borrowing/adaptation/appropriation/intertextuality
  • Shakespeare and death
  • Speaking to/of and impersonating the dead in Shakespeare
  • Shakespeare, religion, and reformations of ritual
  • Shakespeare and memory/remembrance
  • Shakespeare and time: temporality/anachronism/archaism
  • Shakespeare and early modern conceptions of ‘life’
  • Emotion and embodiment in Shakespeare
  • Performing Shakespeare: now and then
  • Transcultural Shakespeare
  • Critical and theoretical conceptions of/engagements through Shakespeare
  • Textual resurrections: editing Shakespeare
  • Rethinking Shakespearean biography
  • Enlivening Shakespeare teaching
  • Shakespeare in a digital age

The conference will be held in the official run-up to Hull’s year as the UK’s City of Culture in 2017. The programme will include plenary lectures, papers, seminars, workshops, and performances at Hull Truck and the Gulbenkian Centre. There will also be special workshops and sessions directed towards pedagogy.

We welcome proposals for papers (20 minutes), panels (90 minutes), or seminars/workshops (90 minutes) on any aspect of the conference theme, broadly interpreted. Abstracts (no more than 200 words) should be sent to bsa2016@hull.ac.uk by 15 December 2015.

Participants must be members of the British Shakespeare Association at the time of the conference. Details of how to join can be found here: www.britishshakespeare.ws

CALL FOR PAPERS: The Cultural Influence of Lucy Harington Russell, Countess of Bedford

“Life of the Muses’ day, their morning star!”
The Cultural Influence of Lucy Harington Russell, Countess of Bedford

11–12 August 2016, Lincoln College, Oxford

Paper proposals are invited for a conference dedicated to the cultural influence of Lucy Harington Russell (1580–1627), Countess of Bedford. Lady Bedford was the pre-eminent woman patron of early seventeenth-century England, and a key figure behind the artistic achievements of such luminaries as John Donne, John Dowland, Ben Jonson, Michael Drayton, Samuel Daniel, and Aemilia Lanyer. She commissioned John Florio to make the first English translation of Montaigne’s Essais, and herself wrote poetry praised by Donne. Grand full-length portraits and exquisite miniatures testify to her patronage of artists including Nicholas Hilliard, and she worked with architects and landscape designers to produce pioneering estate designs. She participated in the most sumptuous court masques of the Jacobean era, managed her husband’s estates, intervened in politically sensitive marriages, and served as Queen Anna’s most trusted confidant. In an age when women’s voices were suppressed in politics and culture Lady Bedford exerted considerable influence in both arenas. Yet she is almost always discussed in relation to the men whom she enabled and inspired. This conference seeks to place her at the centre of critical enquiry, asking questions about power, politics, patronage, culture, literature, performance, art, architecture, religion, and the body.

Keynotes:
Professor Linda Levy Peck (George Washington University)
Professor Merry Wiesner-Hanks (University of Wisconsin–Madison)

Confirmed speakers include:
Julie Crawford (Columbia); Ariel Franklin-Hudson (Columbia); Karen Hearn (UCL); Erica Longfellow (New College, Oxford); Margaret Maurer (Colgate); Michelle O’Callaghan (Reading); Marion O’Connor (Kent); Barbara Ravelhofer (Durham); Chris Stamatakis (UCL); Jane Stevenson (Aberdeen); Sebastiaan Verweij (Bristol).

The conference organisers are Dr Daniel Starza Smith (Lincoln College, Oxford) and Dr Nadine Akkerman (Leiden/Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study). Please send expressions of interest to daniel.smith@ell.ox.ac.uk by Wednesday, 9 March. Graduate bursaries are available, thanks to generous support from the Society for Renaissance Studies, the Royal Historical Society, and the Royal Musical Association. Please indicate in your email if you would like to be considered for one of these.

CALL FOR PAPERS: “Paratheatrical Entertainments in Shakespeare’s London and London’s Shakespeare” at the World Shakespeare Congress 2016.



Donald Hedrick (Kansas State University) and Edel Semple (University College Cork) Although scholarly interest in available “alternatives” to early modern London theater has recently grown, a focused examination of their relation to Shakespeare has been somewhat absent. Beginning with the position that London’s “entertainment industry” invites a perspective on Shakespeare’s theater which is not dismissive of these entertainments but sees them as integral to and indices of pleasure-production of the time, this seminar aims to redress the existing scholarly gap.

Seminar papers may examine single entertainments (such as bear-baiting, gambling, sports, hearing sermons, drinking, fairs, or other activities), or elements of them in representations or allusions, or they may address the complex theoretical relationship between this culture and Shakespeare’s work. 

Central questions may include these: 
  • What similar or different aesthetics were available in London’s wider entertainment offerings? 
  • In what ways was Shakespeare’s work informed by or even in competition with these entertainments? 
  • What entertainments did Shakespeare depict, how were they inserted, and to what ends? 
  • What was the audience reception of these, either as original recreations or in their secondary representations by Shakespeare? 
  • What is gained or lost in Shakespeare’s “translation” of them? 
  • What sorts of pleasures did they embody for Shakespeare, whether disorderly and “low,” or licit and “higher”? 

Registration for this seminar can be found online at the World Shakespeare Congress 2016 website.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Society for Renaissance Studies 7th Biennial Conference

Society for Renaissance Studies 7th Biennial Conference
School of Culture and Creative Arts, University of Glasgow
18-20 July, 2016

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
Professor Neil Rhodes (University of St Andrews): ‘Making Common in Sixteenth-Century England’
Professor Willy Maley (University of Glasgow): ‘“Patsy Presbys”, or “Pulling the Wool Off Living Sheep”: Milton’s Observations (1649) and Ulster Presbyterianism’
Professor Evelyn Welch (King’s College, London): ‘Renaissance Skin’

We invite proposals for panels and for individual papers from Renaissance scholars from the disciplines of archaeology, architecture, history of art, history, history of science and medicine, literature, music, philosophy and other fields. Proposals for panels (90 minutes) and individual papers (20 minutes) should engage with one of the following themes:
  • Anachronisms
  • Conflict and Resolution
  • Imaging the Nation
  • Reformations and Recusants
  • Beasts
  • Word and Image

The conference will also feature an open strand for papers which engage with themes other than those suggested.

Proposals (max. 400 words) are welcome from both postgraduates and established scholars. They should be sent by Friday 2 October, 2015 to the conference organizers, Mr Andrew Bradburn & Dr Tom Nichols, arts-rensoc2016@glasgow.ac.uk.

Accompanying events will include: visits to leading Renaissance sites and collections in and around Glasgow (including Stirling Castle) and an exhibition of Renaissance prints at the Hunterian Art Gallery.

Further details (e.g. full programme, registrations forms and information about accommodation) will be posted as they become available.

Please note that the Society is particularly keen to encourage postgraduates to offer papers, and we will be able to offer generous bursaries to cover travel, registration and accommodation expenses. Further information about bursary applications will be disseminated in due course.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Dressing Global Bodies

The clothes on our backs...

are intimately connected with bodily experiences, cultural, social and gender portrayals. Economies of fashioning and re-fashioning demonstrate multiple priorities across place and time. The materialities of fashion are shaped by global flows of cloth and beads, furs, ready-made and second-hand apparel, in dynamic processes of exchange.

Pasold Conference 2016 | 7-9 July 2016 | University of Alberta
This international conference will showcase new research on the centrality of dress in global, colonial and post-colonial engagements, emphasizing entangled histories and cross-cultural analyses.

Themes could include, but are not limited to:
  • Cross-cultural practices and patterns of dress and / or body adornment
  • Production and distribution of clothing
  • Gendered and ethnic shaping of dress practice
  • Fashion politics of dress in globalizing contexts
  • Circulation and re-use of dress and dress idioms
  • Design in globalized contexts
  • Representations of clothing cultures
  • Appropriation / acculturation of designs, materials, motifs
  • Dress in colonial / post-colonial contexts

Submission Requirements:

For individual speakers: a 200-word proposal and a 1 page CV

For full panels: a 200-word panel rationale, plus 200 word proposals for each panel participant along with their individual 1 page CVs.

We especially welcome themed panels, maximum three speakers but individuals papers are welcomed as well.

Send all submissions to: dgb.conference@ualberta.ca

Deadline for submissions: 1 October 2015.

Acceptances of papers to be announced: 1 December 2015.

Plenary Speakers:

Fashion in Qing/Early Republican China - Antonia Finnane Professor, School of Historical & Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne
Author of Changing Clothes in China: Fashion, History, Nation

Cultures of Dress within Global Africa - Karen Tranberg HansenProfessor Emerita. Department of Anthropology, Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences, Northwestern University
Author of Salaula: The World of Secondhand Clothing and Zambia

Colonial practice, cross-cultural influences in the dress of colonial Spanish America - Dana LeibsohnPriscilla Paine Van der Poel Professor of Art, Department of Art, Smith College

Principal Organizers:
Beverly Lemire, Department of History & Classics, University of Alberta lemire@ualberta.ca
Giorgio Riello, Department of History and Director, Institute of Advanced Studies, University of Warwick pasold.research@warwick.ac.uk

For further information please refer to http://www.dressingglobalbodies.com

CALL FOR PAPERS: Early Modern Wales: Space, Place and Displacement

Cymru Fodern Gynnar: Gofod, Lle a Symudiad

An interdisciplinary symposium hosted by the National Library of Wales, 6-7 July 2016, organised by Bryn Williams and Rachel Willie (Bangor University)

Confirmed keynote speakers:
Professor Sarah Prescott (Aberystwyth University)
Professor Philip Schwyzer (University of Exeter)

[Henry VIII] deliuered [the Welsh] wholy from all seruitude, and made them in all poynets equall to the Englishmen. Wherby it commeth to passe, that laying aside their old manners, they, who before were wonte to liue most sparingly: are now enritched and do imitate the Englishmen in diet, & apparell, howbeit, they be somedeale impatient of labour, and ouermuch boastying of the Nobilitie of their stocke, applying them selues rather to the seruice of noble men, then geuynge them selues to the learnyng of handycraftes.
                          Humphrey Llwyd, The Breviary of Britain trans. Thomas Twyne (1573)

In The Breviary of Britain, Humphrey Llwyd laments the acculturalisation processes that he perceives to have led to the anglicisation of the Welsh gentry. The Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542 formally annexed Wales to the Kingdom of England and thus changed the relationship between the English and the Welsh. Tudor kingship used the space of Wales to claim a right to the English throne and some Welsh gentry held prominent places at court, but what was Wales and how does the space of Wales connect to England? The ‘geographic turn’ in early modern studies has led to renewed interest in space and place and perennial concerns regarding national identity, memory and language have drawn attention to the landscape of Wales. This interdisciplinary symposium, organised in partnership between the National Library of Wales, the Society for Renaissance Studies and the School of English Literature, Bangor University, brings together scholars working in the fields of Welsh History, Literature, Philosophy, Art History and Musicology to interrogate what we understand by Wales in the early modern period.

Topics addressed may include (but are not limited) to:
  • Space or place
  • Wales and the cartographic imagination
  • Topography
  • Language and rhetoric
  • Politics
  • Identity
  • Migration
  • Exile
  • Memory and remembering the past
  • Welsh landscape
  • Liminality
  • Wales and visual culture 

We welcome abstracts of no more than 250 words for twenty-minute papers, to be sent to emwales@bangor.ac.uk by 29 February 2016.

The symposium will be followed by the Society for Renaissance Studies’ Annual Welsh Lecture: Professor Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex), 'William Thomas (d.1554): A Welsh Traitor in Italy'

CALL FOR PAPERS: 5th Scientiae Conference on Disciplines of Knowing in the Early Modern World (approx. 1400-1800)

Second Call for Papers, Scientiae Oxford 2016, St Anne’s College, University of Oxford, 5-7 July 2016

Keynote Speakers: Martin Kemp (Oxford), Wouter Hanegraaff (Amsterdam), Tara Nummedal (Brown)

Convenor: Georgiana Hedesan (Oxford), Senior Adviser: Howard Hotson (Oxford), Organising Team: Karen Hollewand (Oxford), Cornelis Schilt (Sussex), Luca Guariento (Glasgow)

Proposals are invited for the fifth annual Scientiae conference on disciplines of knowing in the early modern world (roughly 1400-1800). The major premise of this conference series is that knowledge during this period was inherently interdisciplinary, involving complex mixtures of theories, practices and objects, which had yet to be separated into their modern ‘scientific’ configurations. Although centred on attempts to understand and control the natural world, Scientiaeaddresses natural philosophy, natural history, and the scientiae mixtae within a wide range of related fields, including but not restricted to Biblical exegesis, medicine, artisan practice and theory, logic, humanism, alchemy, magic, witchcraft, demonology, divinatory practices, astronomy, astrology, music, antiquarianism, experimentation and commerce. Attention is also given to mapping intellectual geographies through the tools of the digital humanities.

Scientiae Oxford 2016 welcomes proposals from researchers studying the early modern cultures and disciplines of knowing at any stage in their career. The proposals can be for individual papers, complete panels, roundtables or workshops, according to the following guidelines:

Individual paper: A 300-word abstract for papers of maximum 20 minutes.

Panel Proposal: Each panel will be 1 hour 30 minutes and must include three speakers. The panel organiser should send a proposal containing three 200-word abstracts for papers of 20 minutes each together with an overall account of the panel (max. 300 words).

Roundtable: Each roundtable will also last 1 hour 30 minutes, must include at the very least one chair and one or two respondents, and must engage the audience. The roundtable proposal should formulate a clear question and provide a rationale for it of c. 400-600 words.

Workshop (new at Scientiae 2016): A workshop is an opportunity for teaching and learning in some area of early modern intellectual and/or material culture. Examples might include period instruments, laboratory practices, pedagogic or art techniques, digital humanities and print culture. A proposal of 400-800 words should be provided by the organiser(s), together with details about the organisation, duration, and presenters. Workshop leaders will also need to work out logistical issues well in advance, with limited assistance from on-site conference convenors. Advance sign-up by participants will be required.

Please submit your proposal together with a brief bio (up to 300 words) by using the online form http://scientiae.co.uk/submission-form/. All submissions should be made by 15 November 2015.

For more information, please also see the Oxford Scientiae website at http://scientiae.co.uk/oxford-2016/.

Dr Georgiana D. Hedesan
Wellcome Trust Fellow
University of Oxford
History Faculty
George Street
Oxford, OX1 2R

@acadscientiae #Scientiae2016

CALL FOR PAPERS: IARHS and the IMC 2016: "Food, Feast, and Famine."

Leeds, 4-7 July 2016

The International Association for Robin Hood Studies is proposing two sessions for next year's Leeds, whose conference theme is "Food, Feast, and Famine."

Leeds will only consider fully formed sessions. Please send 300-word abstracts for either proposed session by 15 September 2015 to Lesley A. Coote (L.A.Coote@hull.ac.uk) AND Kristin Bovaird-Abbo (Kristin.BovairdAbbo@unco.edu).

"Food and Feast in Medieval Outlaw Texts"
The romances of medieval England are full of scenes of feasting and eating. Food, its preparation, and its consumption are present as central points of human interaction, community, and fellowship, providing opportunities to examine and analyze agricultural and mercantile practices as well as trade, economics, and the social standing of its producers and consumers; and feast scenes perform a wide variety of functions, serving as a cultural repository of manners and behaviors, a catalyst for the adventure, a “cute-meet” for the lovers, a moment of regrouping and redirecting the narrative, a testing ground for the chivalric and courteous skills of the attendees, an occasion on which some important revelation is made, and a culminating moment of narrative resolution, for instance. But what about in medieval outlaw tales? How important are food and feasting in the tales of Robin Hood, Gamelyn, Hereward the Wake, Eustache the Monk, and Fouke le Fitz Waryn, for example? This session will consider the presence and function of food and feast in medieval outlaw tales, with an eye to considering whether and how instances of food preparation and eating in these tales can be said to display, to develop, or to subvert the conventional ideas of community and fellowship most commonly associated with foods and feasts in secular medieval literature.

"Ecocritical Outlaws"
At an ICMS session in 2015, a panel posed the question "What Can Medieval Studies Bring to Ecocriticism?" Although the responses were diverse, none touched on the specific subgenre of outlaw literature, and this absence is reflected in much of the published ecocriticism scholarship. This panel seeks to initiate conversations about ecocritical issues in various outlaw tales, including but not limited to Robin Hood, Gamelyn, Fouke Fitz Waryn, and Án Bow-Bender. Given the liminal spaces which these tales occupy, as well as their frequent movements from greenwood into urban spaces, these tales are rich for ecological study. What do these stories reveal about medieval forest practices or perspectives towards animals (and their relationships and/or kinships to humans)? To what extent do these tales critique medieval ecological beliefs or offer alternative perspectives (that is, do they reveal a plurality of attitudes towards nature co-existing during the medieval period)? Given that Rebecca Douglass, in “Ecocriticism and Middle English Literature,” argues that “[E]cocriticism is . . . informed by a desire to understand past and present connections between literature and human attitudes regarding the earth,” what does the study of medieval outlaw tales offer to ecocritical studies? This panel welcomes a variety of approaches, including ecofeminist perspectives, cultural ecology, deep ecology, animal studies, ecolinguistics, and other innovative approaches.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Green Britain: Nationhood and the Environment 1500-1750

25th June 2016, Shakespeare Institute, Stratford-upon-Avon

CfP deadline: 31st March 2016

Abstracts of 250 words for papers of no more than twenty minutes in length to be sent to greenbritain2016@gmail.com

Keynote speaker: Professor Karen Edwards, University of Exeter

During the early modern period, national identity was increasingly defined by the dynamic between people and the environment they populated. While many still longed for the pastoral ideal of Britain as the ‘Eden of Europe’, the looming threat of pollution, natural disaster, resource depletion, and urbanisation beset the thoughts of contemporary writers, theologians, and politicians. Though it had been long held that the environment had an observable influence on the fortunes of a nation and the character of its citizens, the inhabitants of early modern Britain now became gradually conscious of their impact on the natural world. Environmental issues of increasing variety and scale plagued early modern Britain as society struggled to sustain a rapidly expanding population. From changes in agricultural land use and poor forestry management, to the increasing reliance on the smog-inducing ‘sea-coal’ for fuel, many feared adverse effects on the minds, bodies, and souls of British citizens. Against this backdrop of environmental degradation, Britons were also forced to contend with the harshest decades of the so-called ‘Little Ice Age’ and a series of extreme weather events that were habitually seen as acts of divine retribution against the Lord’s elect nation. Further to this, new scientific developments in meteorology and geography, and the rise of Baconian methodology, increasingly affected the contemporary theory and practice of environmental governmentality. Differences in race, ethnicity, and national character were explained according to climate and colonies judged on their suitability to the British complexion, with climatological observations acting as an incentive for colonial exploitation.

Beyond vague collocations of Merry England’s ‘green and pleasant lands’, ‘Green Britain’ therefore aims to explore the complex relationship between national identity and the environment in a period of tumultuous ecological change. What conclusions can we derive from the study of early modern environmental issues, and how can we apply these to the complex idea of the early modern identity? To what extent is nationhood defined by the dynamic that exists between people, space, and place? And furthermore, is it possible to define an early modern attitude toward green issues? To this end, we invite proposals for both panels and papers based on the themes of nationhood and/or early modern ‘green’ issues for our one-day interdisciplinary symposium on 25th June, 2016.


Topics may include, but are not limited to:
  • Travel writing
  • Emerging scientific discourses
  • Climate theory
  • Pollution
  • Space and place
  • Cartography and map-making
  • Seascapes and maritime history
  • Town and country
  • Cultivation and Agriculture
  • Geography and Meteorology
  • Astrology and Cosmology
  • Enclosure and land ownership
  • Colonialism and Empire
  • Providence and providential disaster
  • Natural philosophy
  • Ecological issues
  • Diseases and cures
  • Vegetarianism
  • Animals and animal rights
https://greenbritain.wordpress.com/
@greenbritain16

CALL FOR PAPERS: MEMS Summer Festival

17th-18th June 2016

MEMS Summer Festival is a two-day celebration of all research in the Medieval and Early Modern periods, including the study of religion, politics, history, art, drama, literature, and everyday culture of different nations from c.400-1800. The festival is designed to bring together scholars from a range of disciplines, academic schools and institutions in order to foster conversations, build a greater sense of community, and develop a research network for all masters and PhD postgraduate students and academic staff within the South-East of England.

We would like as many students and staff as possible to come and talk about their work, and therefore invite the following:
  • Abstracts of c.250 words for individual research papers of 20 minutes in length on any subject contained with Medieval and Early Modern studies. Early work is as welcome as more advanced projects, and in each case we’re interested to hear about your methodologies and working practices.
  • Abstracts of c.700 words from a group of three who would each like to present a subject specific panel with research papers of 20 minutes in length. Ideas from CHASE students so far include medieval patronage of all kinds, for which separate a call will be sent out, and early modern written cultures.

If you have an idea but no fellow panellists, we are happy to publicise it for you through our channels and under our Festival banner, but with your own contact details. Please contact us at the email below.

This is a wonderful opportunity to showcase some of your own research, share ways of working, benefit from the ideas of others, and develop networks for future collaboration.  This year’s festival will be held at the University of Kent at Canterbury.

Please submit all paper and panel applications to: memsfestival@gmail.com by 15th April 2016.

This event is jointly sponsored by the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies at the University of Kent, the Consortium for the Humanities of the Arts South-East England, and the Eastern Arc Research Consortium.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Early Medieval Graphicacy in a Comparative Perspective

International Conference: Early Medieval Graphicacy in a Comparative Perspective
University of Oslo, Blindern, Oslo
9–10 June, 2016

Conference Website

Organizers: Prof. Ildar Garipzanov and Dr Romy Wyche

This conference is the last of a series for the Graphicacy and Authority in Early Medieval Europe Project. The aim of the project has been to gather scholars from a wide range of disciplines to discuss the increasing role of non-figural graphic devices across a wide range of media, from manuscripts to architecture and mass-produced objects.

Visual communication in Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages is conventionally analysed using methods specific to either figural imagery (and visualcy of the past) or literary productions (and literacy). In contrast, our project focuses on non-figural graphic devices which are intermediaries between texts and pictures, and which appear during Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages. The project operates with a working hypothesis that these graphic compositions attest to early graphicacy, which has been defined as a visual mode of communication of conceptual information and abstract ideas by means of non-figural graphic devices, which may comprise inscribed letters, words, or decorative symbols. For a recent discussion of early graphicacy, click here and for more information about the project, please visit our website.

Our previous conferences have examined functions and contextual usage of graphic devices such as monograms, christograms, the staurogram, the sign of the cross and symbolic ornaments on a wide array of material as well as the monogrammatic and decorated initials, graphic symbols, and ornamental designs that appear in early medieval manuscripts. In this closing conference, we would like to include early non-figural graphic devices that are more familiar to specialists in modern graphicacy, namely maps and diagrams.

The objective of this conference is to gather scholars from a wide range of disciplines including but not limited to art history, archaeology and cultural history of Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages in the Latin West and Greek East for comparative discussions of early non-figural graphic devices in different media, regions, or chronological periods. We are especially interested in papers dealing with different forms of early graphicacy in a comparative perspective as well as common cognitive mechanisms that enable their deployment in visual communication.

Please submit your proposal (about 300 words) and a short academic CV (no more than a page) at the following link by 1 October, 2015. Places are limited to allow us to subsidise some costs, including registration fee and refreshments. If you have any question please contact Dr Romy Wyche at r.m.wyche@iakh.uio.no.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Shakespeare in the North

Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK
2 June 2016

Keynote speakers: 
Professor Lisa Hopkins (Sheffield Hallam)
Professor Richard Wilson (Kingston)
Professor Peter Davidson (Aberdeen)

The four-hundredth anniversary of Shakespeare’s death in 2016 will, more than ever, focus attention on this question: where and to whom does Shakespeare belong? Much critical work has been done on Shakespeare’s global reach and ‘travels’, especially in relation to processes of colonisation and postcolonial emancipation. Through this work, Shakespeare has been shown to be ‘local’ to many environments across the globe, however problematically. Equally, thinking about Shakespeare’s role in, and appropriation and construction by the various, conflicted, diasporic, devolving and devolved communities of the British Isles has become a critical orthodoxy. Yet what of Shakespeare’s position in locations which, while not seeking independence or devolution through political means, retain a strong sense of being different and separate from official (privileged) strands of national culture? Because they do not fall neatly into the categories of either the ‘nation’ or the ‘colony’, these locations and their engagement with Shakespeare can become invisible and critically neglected. This neglect corresponds with such locations’ perceived and actual socio-political distance from sites of cultural and political power.

We therefore welcome 200-word abstracts for 20-minute papers that might address the following questions or related topics:
  • As we approach another moment of significant reflection on Shakespeare’s place in the world, can and should we speak of ‘Shakespeare in the North’?
  • When we say the ‘North’ where do we mean? What are the North’s edges and boundaries? How does addressing questions like these affect perceptions and uses of culturally central figures like Shakespeare?
  • How can we extend our understanding of the tensions involved in seeing Shakespeare as a ‘universal’ writer and seeing him as a property of a particular nation, to a micro-level of regional reception, reinvention, and appropriation?
  • In what ways has Shakespeare been appropriated in the ‘North’ of England, Scotland and Northern Ireland? What effects has this appropriation had on Shakespeare and the regions of the ‘North’?
  • How, for example, do Barrie Rutter’s Northern Broadsides challenge understandings of ‘metropolitan’ Shakespeare?
  • What might the function and history of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s annual visits to Newcastle upon Tyne tell us about the role of professional (and amateur) Shakespearean theatre in provincial locations?
  • In a political climate in which Northern territories actively query notions of ‘British unity’ (in both Scotland and Northern Ireland), what relevance might Shakespeare have to ‘Northern’ political autonomies?
  • What theoretical frameworks might be applicable to understanding ‘regional’ or local Shakespeares?
  • What is at stake in the scholarship surrounding the biographical and religious controversies surrounding Shakespeare’s ‘time’ in the ‘North’?
  • How did Shakespeare and his contemporaries demarcate and perceive the ‘North’ and Northern-ness?

Please submit abstracts to Adam Hansen by 1 January 2016 (adam.hansen@northumbria.ac.uk).

CALL FOR PAPERS: Marian Iconography East and West

The Tenth International Conference of Iconographic Studies
to be held in Rijeka (Croatia), June 02 - 04, 2016

Organizers:
Center for Iconographic Studies - University of Rijeka (Croatia) in collaboration with Study of Theology in Rijeka, University of Zagreb (Croatia), University of Thessaly (Greece), University of Ljubljana (Slovenia), Gregorian Pontifical University Rome (Italy)

The conference seeks to explore and discuss recent development in the dialogue between theology, art history, philosophy and cultural theory concerning the iconography of Mary in Eastern and Western art. We welcome academic papers that will approach this subject in an interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse way.

The themes and subjects can include the following:
  • early representations of Mary
  • images of intercession and authority
  • devotional iconography
  • Mary Mother of God
  • Virgin as queen
  • Mary as Ecclesia
  • Mary and Eve
  • Life of the Virgin
  • post-Tridentine iconography
  • hermeneutical and phenomenological aspects of Mary

Paper proposals should be submitted electronically to cis@ffri.hr
Deadline for paper proposals: March 30, 2016

Contact person:
Sanja Jovanović
Center for Iconographic Studies
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
University of Rijeka
Sveucilisna avenija 4
51 000 Rijeka
Croatia
E-mail: cis@ffri.hr


A paper proposal should contain:
1. full name, institution, affiliation, address, phone number(s), e-mail address
2. title
3. abstract (maximum 2 pages – 500 words)

Deadline: March 30, 2016

Invitations to participate will be sent out by email before April 15, 2016
There is NO registration fee
Administration and organizational costs, working materials, lunch and coffee breaks during conference as well as all organized visits are covered by the organizers.
All presented papers will be published in the thematic issue of the IKON journal in May 2017.

Please contact us for any additional information.
web page: http://ikon.ffri.hr
Download info .pdf

The Musical Humanism of the Renaissance and its Legacy

Online registration is now open for the University of Warwick’s Conference.

To book a place please visit:

“The Musical Humanism of the Renaissance and its Legacy”

Conference details:
Warwick in Venice, 2-4 June 2016

Theme: In modern Western culture, music is often defined as the art of feeling or the language of the soul. This conception of music has its origins in the musical humanism of the Renaissance, whose influence on musical thought was as enduring as it was widespread. Even though Renaissance humanism had no concrete link to the musical practice of antiquity, humanistic concerns were pivotal for the development of contemporary music and musical thought. Ancient and medieval stories about musical ethos, in particular about the power of music to move the passions, were of special interest to Renaissance scholars. This conference will investigate these Renaissance conceptions of the connection between music and mind, their origins, and how they were ultimately developed into our modern notion of music as an expressive art.

For more information, please contact us at j.w.prins@warwick.ac.uk.

Jacomien Prins
Centre for the Study of the Renaissance (CSR)
University of Warwick, IAS, Millburn House
Coventry CV4 7HS

t.: +44 (0)24 765 73639
e.: j.w.prins@warwick.ac.uk
e-Portfolio: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/about_us/centrestaff/researchfellows/prins/


https://www.facebook.com/jacomien.prins ~ @JacomienPrins

CALL FOR PAPERS: Shakespeare and Cervantes: 1616 - 2016

2016 marks the fourth centennial of the death of the greatest Renaissance writers: William Shakespeare and Miguel de Cervantes. Potential contributors are invited to celebrate their global cultural legacy. Submissions might address any related issues including, but certainly not limited to, the following:

  • The myth of authorship: Cervantes’s fictitious authorship (Mata, 2008) and the Shakespeare authorship question (Bradbeer and Casson, 2015)
  • Shakespeare’s and Cervantes’s role in the genealogy of such modern ideas as love and friendship (Donskis, 2008) as well as in the humanist educational revolution;
  • The two writers’ concerns overlapping with our understanding of Green politics (Egan, 2006);
  • Imitating and imitated: Shakespeare, Cervantes, and the dynamics of literary influence;
  • Servants’ resistance (Shin, 2010) in Shakespeare’s and Cervantes’ works as a literary solution to the narrative and ideological problem of ineffectual or tyrannical authority;
  • Popular historical and political appropriations of Shakespeare and Cervantes as part of a wider popular culture interest and investment in the Renaissance (Semenza, 2010);
  • Shakespeare, Cervantes, and the problem of adaptation: the wide variety of guises under which their work circulates;
  • Shakespeare’s wife (Greer, 2008), Cervantes’s daughter, and the ‘problematic’ woman (Gay, 1994) in their life and works;
  • The roots of political theory and the discourse of politics in the writings of Shakespeare and Cervantes (Cascardi, 2012).

Deadline for article submission: 1 June 2016. We welcome papers in English, Spanish, French, German, and Romanian. Please send the abstracts (ca 200 words), the full paper (up to 7000 words), as well as a brief biographical note (ca 400 words) to the following addresses: lumi_t@yahoo.com, corneliamacsiniuc@yahoo.com

For details regarding style, please visit the following page:http://meridiancritic.usv.ro/index.php?page=instructions-to-authors 

We also welcome book-length studies in the field of literature and linguistics, published in 2015, to be reviewed in our journal. Please send the books to the following address: Meridian critic, Facultatea de Litere şi Ştiinţe ale Comunicării, Universitatea „Ştefan cel Mare” Suceava, Str. Universităţii nr. 13, 720229 Suceava, Romania