Renaissance News

CALL FOR PAPERS: The International Christopher Marlowe

A 2-day conference at the University of Exeter
7th – 8th September 2015

Much current and historical scholarship has tended to consider Marlowe’s plays, poems and translations from an English cultural and literary perspective. With one or two exceptions, his connections to the thought and literature of non-English cultures have been less thoroughly explored, even as scholars have begun to examine the highly cosmopolitan, multi-lingual character of English literary production and consumption during the 1580s and 1590s.

To what extent was Marlowe an ‘international’ writer? In what ways did his work absorb, respond to, imitate or challenge literary, dramatic and intellectual trends in France, Spain, Italy, the Holy Roman Empire, the Netherlands, Turkey or further afield? What role, if any, has the reception of his work played in non-English-speaking cultures?

We invite proposals for papers of up to 30 minutes on any aspect of the “international” content or contexts of Marlowe and his work. Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words to E.J.Paleit@exeter.ac.uk or N.Williams@exeter.ac.uk by 14th November 2014. We also welcome any queries at this address.

Organisers: Dr. Edward Paleit, Nora Williams (University of Exeter)

CALL FOR PAPERS: Early Modern Women and the Book: Ownership, Circulation, and Collecting

Proposals are sought for a panel — “Early Modern Women and the Book: Ownership, Circulation, and Collecting” — to be proposed for the annual meeting of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing (SHARP) in Montreal and Longueuil, Quebec, July 6-11, 2015.

We seek proposals for papers that examine early modern British women who owned books, circulated books, or created libraries or book collections between 1500-1700, a period that saw increased literacy and a revolution in book production and circulation. Scholars have reconstructed and assessed the collections and libraries of Renaissance men, including Harvey, Dee, Jonson, Hales, and Drake; women’s book ownership, as a subject of scholarly inquiry, “awaits its historian,” observes David McKitterick (2000) in a study of Elizabeth Puckering’s library. What resources (commonplace books, poetry miscellanies, inventories, etc.) shed light on women’s circulation of books within communities? What are the marks — figurative, material, cultural — of women’s book usage, ownership, and collecting? What can the creation of book collections or libraries tell us about social status, family ties, confessional affiliations, education, economic status, travels? What methodologies illuminate these interrelated topics?

By Oct. 1, 2014, please send a file containing a 350 word abstract and a 50-word biographical statement to Leah Knight (lknight@brocku.ca), Micheline White (micheline.white@carleton.ca), and Elizabeth Sauer (esauer@brocku.ca) for consideration.


Middle Ages in the Modern World (MAMO) 2015

Following the success of MAMO 2013, held at St Andrews last year, we are proud to announce that a follow-up conference will be held from Monday 29 June to Thursday 2 July 2015 at the University of Lincoln. It will also be held in conjunction with Lincoln’s celebrations of the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta, where Lincoln’s own copy of the Magna Carta will have returned and be back proudly on display in the castle.

As the title suggests, MAMO aims to explore the continued return to, and relevance of, the Middle Ages in the modern world, and why the period continues to attract audiences and scholars. Particularly, its interdisciplinary focus is designed to explore a range of areas, from popular culture to public history, from science to advertising, and even legal frameworks and political rhetoric. Given the popularity of medievalism as a growing discipline, and given the fantastic reception of the last conference, we are expecting a wide audience from a range of fields and disciplines including History, Literature, Film & Television, Video Games, Performing Arts, Drama, Languages, Museum Curation and more besides.

Specific themes include, but are by no means limited to:
  • The reception of the Middle Ages in the arts, music, film, politics & popular culture 
  • The significance and relevance of Magna Carta to the modern world 
  • Medievalism and Orientalism 
  • Translating and interpreting medieval texts 
  • Re-enactment and revival 
  • Fantasy and the Middle Ages 
  • Eco-Medievalism and postmodern approaches to medieval studies 
  • The Middle Ages in Film, Television, Comic Books and Graphic Novels 
  • Medievalism and video games 
  • Science and the Middle Ages 
  • The Middle Ages and documentary programming 

In this first round we welcome both proposals for complete panels as well as individual proposals for papers. There’s also a PDF version for download, so please do spread the word to your networks; click here for the Call for Papers poster.

For individual papers, abstracts of 250-300 words should be sent to themamoconference@gmail.com, by 15 September 2014.

We will be keeping all of the details and information up to date through the Facebook group, through the Twitter hashtag #MAMO2015 or on our conference website, located at www.themamo.org. Details of keynotes will be released shortly, and later in the year we will post further information on accommodation, registration and other details. For specific enquiries or details about the conference themes and logistics please contact Andrew Elliott directly on aelliott@lincoln.ac.uk.

Panel proposals should include abstracts, names and contact details of presenters and a short (c. 200 word) description of the panel itself with the organiser’s contact details; these should be sent by Sunday 31 August 2014.

Spenser Society Conference: The Place of Spenser / Spenser’s Places

The Fifth International Spenser Society Conference
Dublin, 18-20 June 2015

The International Spenser Society invites proposals for their next International Conference, to be held in Dublin, Ireland. The conference will address Spenser’s places – domestic, urban, global, historical, colonial, rhetorical, geopolitical, etc. – but also the place of Spenser in Renaissance studies, in the literary tradition, in Britain, in Ireland, in the literary and political cultures of his own moment.

Additionally, a series of programmed focus panels will offer opportunities for discussion of recent important initiatives and directions in Spenser studies: editing; biography; style; Ireland; philosophy and religion; teaching; and digital approaches.

We welcome abstracts from Spenser scholars and Renaissance scholars, graduate students and faculty, for papers that address Spenser’s historical, cultural and literary environments. These include the places and spaces in which he worked and the places and positions through which we approach that work.

The conference will take place in historic Dublin Castle (http://www.dublincastle.ie/) in the heart of the city, with accommodation available in local hotels. It follows the success of four previous ISS conferences, at Princeton (1990), Yale (1996), Cambridge (2001), and Toronto (2006).

An optional bus tour to Kilcolman castle, County Cork and other Spenser-related sites will take place June 21st.

Plenaries: Helen Cooper (University of Oxford), Jeffrey Dolven (Princeton University), Anne Fogarty (University College Dublin)

Confirmed speakers/presiders: Andrew Hadfield, Beth Quitslund, David Lee Miller, Julian Lethbridge, Ayesha Ramachandran, Joseph Loewenstein, Andrew Zurcher, David Wilson-Okamura, Patricia Palmer, Willy Maley, Susannah Brietz Monta, Kevin De Ornellas

Abstracts should be submitted directly to the conference website: www.spenser2015.com

The closing date for submissions is 15 September 2014

Suggested topics might include (but are not restricted to) the following:
  • The reception of Spenser’s poetry
  • Spenser among the poets
  • Spenser and political writing
  • Digital Spenser
  • Spenser and the Sidneys
  • Spenser’s place in Renaissance studies
  • Spenser’s Europe
  • Spenser’s place in Irish studies
  • Spenser’s social networks
  • Spenser and the politics of space
  • Spenser’s imaginative spaces
  • Spenser and early modern Dublin
  • Editing Spenser
  • Spenser and early modern London
  • Spenser in Munster
  • Spenser and Shakespeare
  • Spenser and Raleigh
  • Spenser’s Atlantic world
  • Spenser, history and historiography
  • Spenser and archaeology
  • Material Spenser/Spenser’s materials
  • Structural/topomorphic approaches
  • Spenser’s style
  • Religion and philosophy
  • Spenser’s Books
  • Teaching Spenser

We also invite proposals for poster-board demonstrations of relevant digital and other projects.

Conference Organisers:

Jane Grogan (University College Dublin), Andrew King (University College Cork), Thomas Herron (East Carolina University)

Sponsored by the International Spenser Society

http://www.english.cam.ac.uk/spenseronline/iss/

CALL FOR PAPERS: IASEMS Conference 2015 - Humour in Shakespeare's Arcadia: Gender, Genre and Wordplay in Early Modern Comedy

Florence, 23rd April 2015

The 2015 Italian Association of Shakespearean and Early Modern Studies (IASEMS) Graduate Conference at The British Institute in Florence is a one-day interdisciplinary and bilingual English-Italian forum open to PhD students and researchers who have obtained their doctorates within the past 5 years. This year’s conference will focus on the theme of comedy in early modern texts, and on how humour is produced in language and plot, what purposes it serves and how it can be related to issues of gender and genre. From Mikhail Bakhtin’s emphasis on the comic body to more recent explorations of the way erotic desire can be displaced by humour, early modern texts offer endless examples of improvisatory, situational or physical humour (whether deriving from the Elizabethan clown tradition or from the comic counterparts in medieval miracle and mystery plays) as well as sophisticated scripted humour and parody of romantic clichés. As is well known, humour, or “comic relief” can also be found in non-comic texts, such as tragedies, romances, epic poetry or pamphlets, often causing disruption of generic expectations and blurring the lines of genre distinction. Proposals can therefore address, from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives, the impact and the implications of humour or comedic infiltrations in a wide range of early modern English texts. 

Candidates are invited to send a description of their proposed contribution according to the following guidelines:
  • the candidate should provide name, institution, contact info, title and a short abstract of the proposed contribution (300 words for a 20-minute paper), explaining the content and intended structure of the paper, and including a short bibliography 
  • abstracts are to be submitted by Friday 31 October 2014 by email to ilaria.natali@unifi.it 
  • all proposals will be blind-vetted. The list of selected papers will be available by the end of November 2014 
  • each finished contribution is to last no longer than 20 minutes and is to be presented in English (an exception will 
  • be made for Italian candidates of departments other than English, who can present papers in Italian): Candidates whose first language is not English will need to have their proposals and final papers checked by a mother-tongue speaker 
  • participants will be asked to present a final draft of the paper ten days before the Conference. Selected speakers who are IASEMS members can apply for a small grant 

(http://www.maldura.unipd.it/iasems/iasems_about.html)
For further information please contact Ilaria Natali (ilaria.natali@unifi.it)

CALL FOR PAPERS: Othello's Island 2015

The Annual Conference of the Byzantine, Medieval and Renaissance Periods and their legacies in art, culture, history, literature, etc.

3rd Annual Conference 20-22 March 2015, at the Severis Foundation, Nicosia, Cyprus, (with additional day trip on 23 March)

Convenors:
Emeritus Professor James Fitzmaurice, Northern Arizona University (USA)
Professor Lisa Hopkins, Sheffield Hallam University (UK)
Dr Sarah James, University of Kent at Canterbury (UK)
Dr Michael Paraskos, Cyprus College of Art
Benedict Read FSA, University of Leeds (UK)

Confirmed keynote speakers:
Dr Roger Christofides, University of Huddersfield (UK)
Dr Chris Laoutaris, University of Birmingham (UK)

​We invite initial expressions of interest from academics, independent scholars, members of the public and learned societies in the third European conference on medieval and renaissance cultural and historical studies, Othello's Island. This is being held at the Costas and Rita Severis Foundation, Nicosia, Cyprus, from the 20th to the 22nd March 2015.

​The conference, now in its third year, is developing into an interesting and unique event in the medieval and renaissance studies calendar, combining fascinating academic debate with time spent discovering and exploring the remarkable Mediterranean island of Cyprus. It is always worth remembering that Cyprus was one of the richest kingdoms in the medieval world, being ruled by French and Venetian monarchs and generals for almost 400 years.

The conference Othello's Island has an inevitable bias towards the Mediterranean and Levant simply because of our location. However this is a result of self selection by potential speakers and we are in truth interested in hearing papers on all aspects of medieval and renaissance culture and history.

The conference will take place at the Severis Foundation in the historic old town area of Nicosia from 20 to 22 March 2015, and there will be an optional trip to see the stunning painted churches of the Troodhos mountains on 23 March. These churches are UNESCO protected (for more details click here).

Possible topics for the conference could include:
  • Diverse aspects of medieval and/or renaissance historical and/or cultural studies
  • Aspects of Byzantine historical and/or cultural studies
  • Aspects of Ottoman or other Muslim states historical and/or cultural studies
  • Art, literature and other aspects of culture from the medieval and renaissance periods
  • Connections between late Antiquity and the medieval period
  • Christian and muslim interactions and/or comparative studies
  • The Mediterranean as a factor in medieval and renaissance history and/or culture
  • Shakespeare and/or other writers of the medieval and/or renaissance periods
  • Continuing legacies of the medieval and renaissance culture in the modern period
  • The West, the Mediterranean and the Levant
  • Other aspects of the medieval and/or renaissance periods.

However, at this stage the aim is not to be prescriptive, and so we are open to all suggestions for sessions that explore the medieval and renaissance worlds, or subsequent legacies of those worlds (for example the rise of neo-medievalism in nineteenth-century Europe).

Possible Session (Strand) Organisers
(please note early deadline for strand organisers)

We invite expressions of interest from individuals, groups or organisations interested in convening specific strands within the conference.

Sessions are defined as comprising at least three papers on a common theme. Once your theme and session title is agreed we will advertise it with a Call for Papers specific to your session strand, but the decision on whether to admit any papers submitted to your strand will remain with you. We also ask that where possible you canvas your contacts to submit paper proposals for your session.

If you are interested in proposing a session or strand please contact Dr Michael Paraskos at michael@artcyprus.org before 30 September 2014.

Call for Papers from Individuals
(later deadline for individuals - but we advise early submission)

If you are interested in giving a talk at the conference please submit a proposal for a paper. Standard papers are 20 minutes long, followed by 10 minutes for questions.

​We are very open minded on the topic of papers, so if you have an idea for a presentation that is not covered by the suggestions given above please feel free to submit a proposal, or contact us first to discuss the idea.

Proposals for papers should comprise a cover sheet showing:

1. Your title (eg. Mr, Ms, Dr, Prof. etc.) and full name
2. Your institutional affiliation (if any)
3. Your postal address, e'mail address and telephone number
4. The title of your proposed paper

With this you should send a proposal/abstract for your paper of no more than 300 words and a copy of your CV/resume to mparaskos@mac.com with the subject line OTHELLO 2015.

All papers must be delivered in English.

The deadline for submissions is 31 January 2015. Early submission is strongly advised. We aim to have a decision on the acceptance of papers within four weeks of submission.


The Royal Society - Publish or Perish? Scientific periodicals from 1665 to the present

19-21 March 2015, The Royal Society, London

To celebrate the anniversary of the Philosophical Transactions, the world’s oldest scientific journal, the Royal Society will be hosting a major conference in spring 2015. At a time when the future of scientific publishing is in flux, this conference will take the long perspective by examining the transformations and challenges in the publishing of scientific journals over the last three and a half centuries, and into the future. We seek offers of papers, or proposals for three- or four-paper panels, which engage with any aspect of the commercial, editorial and distribution practices of scientific journal publishing, in any period since 1665, preferably with a comparative or longue durée perspective.

Papers or panels might address:
  • The processes of printing, publishing or illustrating scientific journals
  • The commercial practices of journal publishing
  • The development of editorial and refereeing processes
  • Distribution networks and marketing – regional, national and international
  • Issues concerning the status, reputation and reception of competing journals
Offers of papers, including a 250-word abstract, should be sent to publishorperish@royalsociety.org by the 30th of November 2013.

Participants must be willing and able to prepare their paper for speedy publication in autumn 2015.

Philosophical Transactions at 350

The Philosophical Transactions turns 350 on March the 6th, 2015. To celebrate this milestone in the history of science communication, a programme of events and activities is being planned for the Anniversary year. In addition, a major AHRC-funded research project, led by Dr Aileen Fyfe at the University of St Andrews in partnership with the Royal Society, is already under way, which will produce the first full history of the Philosophical Transactions.

www.royalsociety.org
https://arts.st.andrews.ac.uk/philosophicaltransactions/

Dr Noah Moxham
School of History, University of St Andrews
Postdoctoral Research Fellow

The Marginalisation of Astrology

Utrecht, 19-20 March 2015; Deadline 30 September 2014






The Descartes Centrum for history of science of the University of Utrecht, in collaboaration with the department of philosophy of the Radboud University at Nijmegen, will host an international conference on the problem of the marginalization of astrology in the early modern period.

Astrology has been a well-established and respected part of scholarship for centuries, practiced in many cultural and geographical settings. However, in the modern world, astrology, though still very much present, has lost its scientific status and is relegated to the fringes of serious learning. In the history of the sciences, this must be regarded as a momentous shift. The definite step in the “marginalization” of astrology appears to have been taken in the seventeenth century and should therefore be regarded as an important element (rather than as a consequence) of the so-called Scientific Revolution.

The reasons for this development are far from clear. Actually, even the development itself (when, where and by whom did astrology become disavowed) has so far been only poorly documented. The conference therefore aims at bringing together specialists from various fields to throw light on this intruiging question.

It is the aim of the conference to study the subject from various different angles:

· History of astrology. Although the project is about people NOT practising astrology rather than about astrologers, the history of astrology proper remains of course central. At the very least, an attempt should be made to compare differences in astrological practice (and their marginalization) between various local, cultural and religious contexts. Other relevant questions concern criticisms and apologies of astrology and attempts at astrological reform.

· History of science. The idea that astrology was discredited directly because of new scientific discoveries is no longer regarded as credible; on the other hand, it does not appears believable that there was no connection at all. The dismissal of astrology implied a transformation of the work and the identity of astronomers. In natural philosophy, it implied a rejection of the idea of celestial influence, which had become an integral part of scholastic philosophy.

· History of medicine. Medicine was a major application of astrology. Medieval physicians would routinely cast horoscopes for diagnostic and other purposes. The question is when and how this changed. Obviously, both the supply and the demand sides have to be taken into account.

· Court culture. Important on the side of demand were princely and noble courts. In the sixteenth century, princes would regularly employ court mathematicians/astronomers, whose task it was to cast horoscopes. In the seventeenth century, on the other hand, Louis XIV spent a fortune on the Paris Observatory, while casting horoscopes was not among the tasks of this institution. Again, the reasons behind this change are not clear.

· Print culture. Almanacs, ephemerides, and prognostics, in conjunction with information on their makers, editions, and distribution, should enable us (at least) to get some idea of the popularity, or lack of popularity, of astrological ideas and practices. This is a field wherein some work has already been done.

· History of religion. The era of the Reformation and Counter Reformation saw important developments in the field of theology, Church discipline and organization, which may have affected the status of astrology. One should also look to what one might call religious anthropology: shifting attitudes toward the supernatural and a changing definition of “superstition”, more or less identifiable with Weber’s “disenchantment of the world”. It is not clear to what extent astrology (as a learned practice) was placed in the same category as other superstitions, but the question should be asked.

· Finally, the question to what extent this development remained limited to Western Europe, and whether similar things happened elsewhere (and when), should not be forgotten, even if it is probably hard to answer at this stage.

People who are interested to give a paper at this conference are invited to send a title and abstract (300 words maximum) by the end of September to the organizers:

· Rienk Vermij, history of science, University of Oklahoma (rienk.vermij@ou.edu)

· Hiro Hirai, department of philosophy, University of Nijmegen (hhirai2@gmail.com)

For all other information, please also contact the organizers mentioned above.

Magic and Intellectual History

Thursday 5th March 2015 - CREMS, University of York

A day symposium – Keynote speaker: Dr Stephen Clucas (Birkbeck)

This symposium will explore the place of magic in the intellectual culture of early modern England and Europe. It will focus on how magic was perceived and understood in philosophical, religious and scientific thought, and the ambivalence that surrounded it as topics of scholarship.

Papers might attend to the following:
  • How did early modern thought accommodate magic into its disciplines?
  • Why was magic the object of so much ‘elite’ scientific and philosophical thought?
  • Magic and the study of nature
  • Magic and the ineffable
  • Redefining the parameters of magic
  • Magic and religion.
  • The occult and hidden operations of nature
  • Scepticism and magical thought
  • Magic and language / magic and metaphor
  • Literature and the portrayal of magic
  • Magic and the devil
  • Magicians and their day-jobs.

Call for Papers: Abstracts by 15th October (c. 250 words)

Contact: Kevin Killeen, kevin.killeen@york.ac.uk

This symposium is part of a diffuse and ongoing Thomas Browne Seminar that has digressed quite far: http://www.york.ac.uk/english/news-events/browne/


Overview

The Thomas Browne Seminar is a forum for exploring the intellectual history of the seventeenth century, the relations between its apparently incompatible disciplines and the social, scientific and political contexts in which they arose. It is not, by any means, restricted to Thomas Browne himself, but also examines more broadly the intellectual culture in the mid-seventeenth century.

Papers are invited on any aspect of mid-century culture, the history of science and scholarship, religious and antiquarian thought, natural history, politics and the history of trivia, in particular, but not restricted to, those related to Browne. As the seminar will involve an ongoing series of meetings, ideas for future seminars are also invited.

The TBS is run jointly by the Department of English and Related Literature and the Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies. Thomas Browne was a significant figure in the scholarly and scientific community of the seventeenth century, who nevertheless defies categorisation and whose blend of humanism, scholasticism and natural philosophy is testament to the intellectual flux of the period.

Research workshop: Mathematical readers in the early modern world

Thursday 18 and Friday 19 December 2014
All Souls College, Oxford

How was mathematical writing consumed – read, used, responded to, and otherwise engaged with – in the early modern period? What was distinctive about mathematical reading, compared with the reading of other kinds of technical writing, or with the reading of prose more generally? Were mathematical books handled or annotated in distinctive ways? Was mathematical reading associated with a distinctive set of locations? How, where and when did readers learn the (presumptively specialized) skills of mathematical reading? These questions will be the subject of this two-day workshop, to be held in All Souls College, Oxford.

Confirmed speakers:
Ken Clements, Illinois State University
Nerida Ellerton, Illinois State University
Kathryn James, Yale University
Yelda Nasifoglu, McGill University
Benjamin Wardhaugh, University of Oxford

Proposals for papers are invited on all aspects of reading and consuming mathematics in the early modern world. Proposals should include an abstract of no more than 250 words and a brief CV, and should be emailed to benjamin.wardhaugh@all-souls.ox.ac.uk by 1 September 2014. The conference can contribute to travel costs for speakers.

‘Ideas and Enlightenment’ The Long Eighteenth Century (Down Under)

University of Sydney, 10-13 December 2014, proposals due 15 June

David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies XV

The Sydney Intellectual History Network and ‘Putting Periodisation to Use’ Research Group at the University of Sydney invite you to the Fifteenth David Nichol Smith Seminar (DNS), with the theme ‘Ideas and Enlightenment’. Inaugurated and supported by the National Library of Australia, the DNS conference is the leading forum for eighteenth-century studies in Australasia. It brings together scholars from across the region and internationally who work on the long eighteenth century (1688-1815) in a range of disciplines, including history, literature, art and architectural history, philosophy, the history of science, musicology, anthropology, archaeology and studies of material culture.

We welcome proposals for papers or panels on the following topics, although please note that the conference organisers are open to proposals for subjects that fall outside of these broad themes:
  • Making Ideas Visible
  • Biography and the History of Individual Life
  • Economic Ideas in Social and Political Contexts
  • Global Sensibilities
  • National Identity and Cosmopolitanism
  • Antiquaries and Alternative Versions of the Classical Tradition
  • Periodisation and the question of Period Styles
  • ‘Enlightenment’ and the Pacific
  • Spectacle, Sociability and Pleasure
  • Genres of Enlightenment
  • Science, Technology and Medicine
  • Borders and Empire
  • Historiography of the Enlightenment
  • Post-Enlightenment trajectories in literature and art

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers. Proposals consist of a 250-word abstract and 2-page cv, sent via email as a pdf attachment tosihn.dns@sydney.edu.au. Deadline for submissions: 15 June 2014

Further details are at http://sydney.edu.au/intellectual-history/news-events/dns-conference-201..., where accommodation and keynotes will be posted soon. If you have questions about the conference, please contact the organizing committee at sihn.dns@sydney.edu.au.

DNS XV Organizing Committee: Dr Jennifer Ferng, Prof Mark Ledbury, Prof Jennifer Milam and Dr Nicola Parsons

‘Moveable Types: People, Ideas and Objects: Cultural exchanges in Early Modern Europe’

University of Kent, 27th-29th November

'Moveable Types' is a three-day conference, held at the University of Kent, which aims to re-examine the processes of cultural exchange in early modern Europe. Traditional historiography has tended to focus on a bilateral transfer of cultures, which, however meaningful, also lift out individual moments of cultural exchange from the environment which made such encounters not only possible, but also significant. By considering cultural exchange in discrete, isolated moments, one runs the risk of oversimplifying the complex networks of cultural exchange in Europe, and thereby skewing European history into a nation-centred perspective.

Recent scholarship such as histoire croisée, entangled histories, cultural translation and actor network theory (ANT) are, meanwhile, looking at such processes in their entirety, as a noisy hubbub rather than a dialogue between binaries (writer and reader, buyer and seller, one nation and another). These approaches explore a network of different elements and characters, all of which are given equal agency in shaping each others' views of the world.

This conference will explore the implications of these recent developments in scholarship by inviting papers with an interdisciplinary approach to cultural exchange in the early modern period. The objective is thus to question the binaries of traditional scholarship, and to suggest new ways of considering the cultural connections that were being formed, broken and reformed in this period.

Confirmed keynote speakers:
Andrew Pettegree (University of St Andrews);
Tiffany Stern (University of Oxford);
Gilles Bertrand (Université Pierre Mendès France, Grenoble);
Ruth Ahnert (Queen Mary, University of London).

We invite papers on the following topics:
  • literary translation and adaptation;
  • exchange of ideas (scientific, humanist, technological, artistic);
  • epistolary networks;
  • theory of cultural exchange or cultural networks;
  • paths of ambassadors, sailors, traders, book pedlars and other travellers;
  • news, gossip and news books;
  • spaces of cultural exchange: cities, fairs, universities, theatres;
  • the making, trading, and consumption of consumer items;
  • any other paper relating to early modern cultural exchange.

Abstracts should be sent to moveabletypesconference@gmail.com before 1st of August 2014 and should not be longer than 300 words. Please include affiliation and contact information, as well as a short biographical note, on a separate document. For more information please visit http://moveabletypes.wordpress.com/ or e-mail moveabletypesconference@gmail.com.

Conference Sponsors:
'Moveable Types' is supported by The Royal Historical SocietyThe University of Kent's School of HistoryThe Kent Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities (KIASH), and Text and Event in Early Modern Europe (TEEME).



Persecution, Punishment, and Purgatory in the Long Middle Ages

10th Annual Pearl Kibre Medieval Study Graduate Student Conference
CUNY Graduate Center, New York, NY, November 7, 2014

The Pearl Kibre Medieval Study, the CUNY Graduate Center’s student-run organization for medieval studies, announces its tenth annual Graduate Student Conference at the CUNY Graduate Center on Friday, November 7, 2014. This year's theme, Persecution, Punishment, and Purgatory, is designed to address a number of methodological, historical, and theoretical issues within the diverse fields of medieval studies ranging from late antiquity to the early modern period. We invite grad students to submit proposals.

Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:
  • Origins and uses of persecution
  • The result of religious and ethnic pogroms
  • Forced conversions and expulsions
  • Persecution as a method of socio-cultural nation and identity formation
  • The character of legal and extra-legal punishment,
  • Punishment as a form of discipline
  • Self-inflicted punishment
  • The role of punishment in the family
  • The variations of punishment based on class, status, and gender
  • Punishment as social control
  • Concepts of the afterlife
  • The relationship between sin/punishment and the afterlife
  • Liminal spaces
  • Peripheries

Please send 200-word abstracts by Friday, August 15th, 2014 to medievalstudy@gmail.com



‘The Royal Typographer and the Alchemist: Willem Sylvius and John Dee’

SHAC event, 26 October 2014: ‘The Royal Typographer and the Alchemist: Willem Sylvius and John Dee’, Museum Plantin-Moretus, Vrijdagmarkt 22, Antwerp, Belgium, 26 October 2014

A meeting sponsored by the Society for the History of Alchemy and Chemistry, ‘The Royal Typographer and the Alchemist: Willem Sylvius and John Dee’, will take place on 26 October at the Plantin-Moretus Museum in Antwerp, Belgium. Coinciding with the 450th Anniversary of the publication of John Dee’s Monas Hieroglyphica, this colloquium will bring together specialists on John Dee and specialists on late sixteenth-century print culture and humanistic activities in Antwerp. The aim of the colloquium is to investigate the links between Antwerp’s vibrant print culture and its relationship to alchemy and the occult philosophy in the late sixteenth century.

Programme:

Stephen Clucas (Birkbeck, University of London), “The printer and the alchemist: John Dee’s Monas Hieroglyphicaafter 450 years”.

Peter J. Forshaw (University of Amsterdam), “John Dee and the Stars (Astrology, Magic, and Alchemy)”

Steven vanden Broecke (University of Ghent) “Spirit, print, and the public good in the productions of Willem Silvius”.

Manuel Mertens, “Willem Silvius and the archive”.

Arjan Vandixhoorn (University of Utrecht), “Printers and the Culture of Knowledge in Sixteenth Century Antwerp: The Vernacular Perspective”.

Goran Proot, “The typographical identity of the Monas hieroglyphica”.

Registration fee: 20 Pounds/20 Euros. To register for this colloquium, or for further information, please contact Stephen Clucas: s.clucas@bbk.ac.uk



Theatres of Conversion workshop: Early Modern Cities, Courts, and Playhouses

Toronto: 24-25 October, 2014
Deadline for application: 1 August 2014

The Theatres of Conversion workshop, co-hosted by the Early Modern Conversions Project and the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS) at Victoria University in the University of Toronto, will study how early modern cities, courts, and playhouses became sites of performative transformation (religious, social, sexual, cultural, human-animal, material). In London, Madrid, Paris, and Lima/Cuzco, among other cities, urban, courtly, and theatrical spatiality and culture attracted people to the metropolis from within national boundaries and across borders between nations, religions, and ethnic identities and afforded migrants the chance to change themselves or be changed in radical ways. Indeed the boundary-crossing movements themselves became the central agents and means of transformation.

In addition to the members of the Early Modern Conversions project, the workshop invites work-in-progress from scholars from the Toronto academic community at all stages of their careers, and especially welcomes the participation of graduate students and recent graduates. The workshop will also feature working sessions that focus on particular texts, works of visual art, music, and artifacts.

To apply to participate, please send a one-page abstract and a short (2-page) CV to conversions@mcgill.ca by 1 August 2014.

Research into the Medieval and Early Modern: Navigating Issues of Engagement

Queen Mary, University of London and London Medieval Graduate Network
Saturday, 18 October 2014 from 10:00 to 18:30 (BST)

This colloquium is free of charge. Lunch and refreshments will be served throughout the day, and the colloquium will be rounded off with a drinks reception.

This one-day Colloquium will focus on the how and why of researchers connecting with wider audiences and ‘the public’, via radio, television, popular books and journals, newspapers, exhibitions, blogs, etc. We want to look into the role of public engagement - to what extent will current graduates need to be – or can they be – involved in this and how will they grow into it? Other questions we may ask are: how can early career researchers be selective and know when to seize opportunities, how can they access various types of media, how can these media be used most effectively, how accessible is the academic ‘style’, and how can public engagement help us to develop and progress professionally?

Many emerging academics would like an opportunity to communicate their research to the public via various forms of media, but they are often unsure how to access these types of media and they might not know the best ways to use these forms of media if an opportunity arises. On a more fundamental level, a common concern is how this type of public engagement might affect an academic’s research life. Will turning a PhD into a more commercially viable book actually be detrimental to academic job applications? Will an appearance on a television or radio programme change the way your colleagues and potential future employers could view you and/or your research? How do we know which opportunities to agree to, and which to turn down? These are some of the questions we hope might be partly answered during the course of this colloquium.

During three panels, the various speakers will explain how they became involved with various projects and how this affected their research (both positively and negatively), and there will be ample time for questions afterwards. The first two sessions will feature several academics talking about public engagement through their own experiences and current projects, whilst the third session will feature industry professionals who will share their experiences in working with academics (publisher, radio producer, artist in residence). As well as offering practical advice for students who want to engage with the public about their research via various media, the event will provide a forum for wider discussion of increasingly important questions on how public engagement ‘fits’ with an academic career and the importance we should place on this aspect of academia.

Although the day will be focused on research into the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (where do these periods even fit in with ideas of ‘public engagement’?), the event is open to all who are interested in attending. The speakers will share some of their own experiences and will offer practical advice, applicable to any field of study.

Our confirmed speakers include Prof. Miri Rubin (Queen Mary, School of History), Prof. Adrian Armstrong (Queen Mary, School of Languages, Linguistics, and Film), Clare Whistler (Leverhulme Art Fellow for the History of the Emotions, 2013/2014) Mukti Campion (BBC radio producer) and Claudia Bickford-Smith (Cambridge University Press). More speakers tbc.

This event is sponsored by QMUL, together with the London Medieval Graduate Network. The main organisers are: Hetta Howes, Ella Kilgallon, and Lydia Zeldenrust.


“Art, Anatomy, and the Body: Vesalius 500″, NYAM's second annual Festival for Medical History and the Arts

The New York Academy of Medicine
1216 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016
Saturday, October 18, 2014
11:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.

On October 18, NYAM’s Center for the History of Medicine and Public Health presents its second-annual Festival for Medical History and the Arts. “Art, Anatomy, and the Body: Vesalius 500″ will celebrate the 500th birthday of anatomist Andreas Vesalius.

Vesalius’ groundbreaking De humani corporis fabrica (The Fabric of the Human Body) of 1543 is a key Renaissance text, one that profoundly changed medical training, anatomical knowledge, and artistic representations of the body, an influence that has persisted over the centuries. Our Festival is one of a global series of celebrations of his legacy.

Our day-long event will explore the intersection of anatomy and the arts with a vibrant roster of performers and presenters, including

  • Heidi Latsky’s “GIMP” Dance Project;
  • the comics artists of Graphic Medicine;
  • Sander Gilman on posture controlling the unruly body;
  • Alice Dreger on inventing the medical photograph;
  • Bill Hayes on researching hidden histories of medicine;
  • Steven Assael, Ann Fox and Chun-shan (Sandie) Yi on anatomy in contemporary art;
  • Chase Joynt’s Resisterectomy, a meditation on surgery and gender;
  • Brandy Schillace on ambivalent depictions of female anatomy in the 18th century;
  • Lisa Rosner on famous body snatchers Burke and Hare;
  • the art of anatomical atlases with Michael Sappol;
  • medical 3D printing demos by ProofX;
  • anatomical painting directly on skin with Kriota Willberg;
  • Daniel Garrison on translating Vesalius for modern audiences;
  • Jeff Levine and Michael Nevins on revisiting the Fabrica frontispiece;

and many more.

In connection with the Festival, NYAM’s Center will host 4 hands-on workshops

1. From the Cradle to the Grave: Session One: The Cradle

Working with NYAM’s conservation team, produce your own articulated anatomical figures in the Gladys Brooks Book & Paper Conservation Laboratory. Participants will have time to make at least one paper baby and pelvis, which can be produced as paper dolls or magnets.

2. From the Cradle to the Grave: Session Two: The Grave

Working with NYAM’s conservation team, produce your own “exquisite corpse” in the Gladys Brooks Book & Paper Conservation Laboratory. To produce a Vesalian-themed exquisite (or rotating) corpse, this workshop will employ a special, rotating binding structure and mix-matched facsimile images from NYAM’s rare book collections to allow students to create their own unique, moveable pieces of art.

3. Renaissance Illustration Techniques Workshop with Marie Dauenheimer, Medical Illustrator

Artists and anatomists passionate about the mysteries of the human body drove anatomical investigation during the Renaissance. In this workshop, students will learn and apply the techniques used by Renaissance artists to illustrate anatomical specimens.

4. Understanding the Hand, physical anthropology workshop with Sam Dunlap, Ph.D.

Basic anatomical dissection, illustration, and knowledge continue to be fundamental in many fields from evolutionary biology to surgery, medical training, and forensic science. This workshop will offer participants the opportunity to explore the human hand and its anatomy, which will be demonstrated with at least three dissections.

Workshop registration fees cover both the workshop and all-day admission to the Festival.

For more information and to register, see http://nyamcenterforhistory.org/vesalius-500/

Paul Theerman, PhD
Associate Director
Center for the History of Medicine and Public Health
New York Academy of Medicine
1216 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY, 10029
212.822.7350
http://nyamcenterforhistory.org/

Dacre Centenary Lectures 2014: Ideas and Society c 1600-1800 (17 Oct to 28 Nov)

Venue: Oxford University Examination schools, High St, Oxford.
Time: Fridays at 5pm.

Provisional titles:

17 October: Colin Kidd, ‘Priestcraft, the Devil and the Union of 1707”

24 October: Anthony Grafton, ‘Humanism and History in the Late Renaissance: Isaac Casaubon, Polybius, and the Political uses of the Past.’

31 October: Jonathan Israel, ‘Radical Enlightenment and the French Revolution’

7 November: David Womersley, ‘Ideas and Society in the Pays de Vaud: Edward Gibbon and Georges Deyverdun read the Classics’.

14 November: Michael Hunter, ‘The Enlightenment Rejection of Magic: New Thoughts on an Old theme’.

21 November: Brian Young, ‘Hume and History’

28 November: Noel Malcolm, ‘Hobbes’s Leviathan and Christian Doctrine’.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Shakespeare’s Unsung Heroes and Heroines

Shakespeare Seminar at the Annual Conference of the German Shakespeare Society

Berlin, 23-26 April 2015

Without Paulina and Antigonus there would be no reunion, however tainted, between Leontes and Hermione, and there would be no union of Perdita and Florizel in The Winter’s Tale. In a sense, then, Paulina and Antigonus are the unsung heroine and hero of the play. Undoubtedly, Antigonus’ exit pursued by a bear is not typical of a tragic hero. Taking Antigonus melodramatic exit as an example, Sir Walter Raleigh, then Professor of English Literature at Oxford, famously complained in 1907 that Shakespeare disposed of his minor characters “in the most unprincipled and reckless fashion.”

In this seminar we would like to explore heroic qualities in Shakespeare’s ‘minor’ characters, and thus equally revisit preconceived notions about the status of these minor characters as well as traditional concepts of the (tragic) hero. What did Shakespeare’s contemporaries make, for example, of Enobarbus deserting Antony and then dying of grief when confronted with Antony’s generosity and Octavius’ cynicism? Was Enobarbus a tragic hero in the eyes of contemporary audiences of Antony and Cleopatra? Do we see him as a tragic hero? What about the minor female characters? Are Ophelia and Lady Anne, for instance, the tragic heroines of Hamlet and Richard III? Considering heroic qualities in Shakespeare’s minor characters can help bring into focus changing attitudes to heroism and hero worship. At the same time, this perspective also allows for probing into more fundamental dramatic and literary conventions: how ‘minor’ are minor characters in Shakespeare’s plays? Does poetic justice only appertain to the great? Which concepts of heroism can we use to take account of marginal characters in the comedies and romances? Which role do categories such as gender and race play in our / the early modern conception of what is ‘heroic’? Which methods (genre theory, network theory, New Historicism) are productive tools to analyse Shakespeare’s minor characters? How have theatrical and filmic adaptations dealt with Shakespeare’s unsung heroes and heroines?

Our seminar plans to address these and related questions with a panel of six papers during the annual conference of the German Shakespeare Association, Shakespeare-Tage (23-26 April 2015 in Berlin), which will focus on “Shakespeare’s Heroes and Heroines.” As critical input for the discussion and provocation for debate, panellists are invited to give short statements on the basis of pre-circulated papers presenting concrete case studies, concise examples and strong views on the topic. Please send your proposals (abstracts of 300 words) and all further questions by 30 November 2014 to the seminar convenors:

Felix Sprang, Humboldt University, Berlin: felix.sprang@hu-berlin.de
Christina Wald, University of Konstanz: christina.wald@uni-konstanz.de

See also: http://shakespeare-gesellschaft.de/publikationen/seminar.html

CALL FOR PAPERS: Science and Information Conference 2015

About the Conference

Science and Information (SAI) Conference is a premier venue for researchers and industry practitioners to share their new ideas, original research results and practical development experiences from Computer Science, Electronics and Communication related areas.

Science and Information Conference 2015 features specialized keynote talks, contributed papers, special sessions, poster presentations, workshops, and tutorials on theory and practice. Its drive is to convene a high quality, well-attended, and up-to-date conference on technology and research.

Science and Information Conference 2015 will be held at London, U.K from July 28-30, 2015. It is hosted by The Science and Information Organization, and is being organized with sponsorship and support from IEEE and Springer.

Technically Sponsored by IEEE Computer Chapter UKRI.

Past Conferences: 
  • Science and Information Conference 2014 was held from August 27-29, 2014, at Park Inn London Heathrow. The Conference was an overwhelming success, attracting 190+ delegates, speakers and sponsors from 50 countries and provided great intellectual and social interaction for the participants. Science and Information Conference 2014 is hosted by The Science and Information Organization, and was being organized with sponsorship and support from Microsoft, RK Trans2Cloud, IEEE and Springer. 
  • Science and Information Conference 2013 witnessed 160 researchers, students and scientists from more than 55 countries attending the conference! The conference was structured with paper and poster presentations from the international community of authors, including presentations from keynote speakers and state-of-the-art lectures It was full of engaging speakers and lively discussion. The conference was technically sponsored by 4 units of IEEE and supported by Springer. 

Important Dates

Early Bird Submission (Submit early and Save £100!)
Paper Submission : November 01, 2014
Acceptance Notification : December 01, 2014
Author Registration : January 15, 2015
Camera Ready Submission : February 01, 2015
Conference Dates : July 28-30, 2015

Regular SubmissionPaper Submission : December 15, 2014
Acceptance Notification : January 15, 2015
Author Registration : February 15, 2015
Camera Ready Submission : March 15, 2015
Conference Dates : July 28-30, 2015

Downloads
Download MS Word Paper Format
Download Latex Paper Format
Download Copyright Agreement Form
Download Call for Papers PDF

Submission Process
  • Authors are kindly invited to submit their formatted full papers/posters including research results, tables, figures and references. 
  • All paper submissions will be blind peer reviewed and evaluated based on originality, research content, correctness, relevance to conference and readability. Please read complete submission and formatting guidelines before submitting your paper. 
  • Online Submission: Paper Submission can be completed online at http://thesai.org/SAIConference2015/Submit
  • Email Submission: If you are unable to submit your manuscript using Online System, you may submit with complete details via email to conference@thesai.org 

Happy Submitting!


Submission Guidelines
  • We accept files in .docx/.doc/.pdf/Latex Pdf format 
  • Please do not enter in author details, university, country information or any other author related information in the manuscript to be in line with the double blind peer review process. This information should be supplied using the manuscript submission online form or cover letter in case of email submission 
  • Articles should be thoroughly checked and proofread before submission, after you have submitted your article you are unable to make any changes to it during the refereeing process—although if accepted, you will have a chance to make minor revisions after refereeing and before the final submission of your article. 

Formatting Guidelines
  • Authors should submit their papers in English of up to 10 double column pages, presenting the results of original research or innovative practical applications relevant to the conference. 
  • Authors must ensure the accuracy of citations, quotations, diagrams, tables and maps. 
  • Figures and images must be clear and easy to view. 
  • Figures and tables need to be placed where they are to appear in the text. If preferred, you can also place images and tables at the end of your article. Please do not submit figures or tables as a separate document. 
  • Papers must be formatted according to the template that can be downloaded by clicking here

Post Conference Publication and Filming

All SAI Conference 2015 papers will be submitted to IEEE Xplore and indexed in various international databases like Scopus, Inspec, DBLP and more. Authors of selected outstanding papers will be invited to submit extended versions of their papers for consideration of publication in the following:

Springer Book Series - Studies in Computational Intelligence, Indexed by DBLP, Ulrichs, SCOPUS, MathSciNet, Current Mathematical Publications, Mathematical Reviews, Zentralblatt Math: MetaPress and Springerlink.
International Journal of Advanced Computer Science and Applications(IJACSA)
International Journal of Advanced Research in Artificial Intelligence(IJARAI)

During the conference, the different talks will be filmed and made available at the conference website.


Review Process

The review process will be double-blind. Therefore, please anonymize your submission. This means that all submissions must contain no information identifying the author(s) or their organization(s): Do not put the author(s) names or affiliation(s) at the start of the paper, anonymize citations to and mentions of your own prior work that are directly related to your present work, and do not include funding or other acknowledgments.

Each paper will be reviewed by at least three regular PC members or two senior PC members. The acceptance decisions will take into account paper novelty, technical depth, elegance, practical or theoretic impact, and presentation.
  • Original: the paper explores a new idea, project or issue; discusses existing research with promise of new insight, discusses new research; or presents new ways of considering existing information 
  • Engaging: presentation format will involve the audience in some way, or has high potential to attract conference attendees by addressing needs of the community 
  • Significant: the paper raises and discusses issues important to improving the effectiveness and/or sustainability of open education efforts, and its contents can be broadly disseminated and understood 
  • Quality: claims are supported by sufficient data; claims draw upon relevant literature; and limitations are described honestly 
  • Clear: the intended outcomes of the paper are easily understood 
  • Relevant: the paper addresses one or more of the themes of the conference 

Publication Ethics and Malpractice Statement

Respecting intellectual property rights is a foundational principle of The SAI Organization's Codes of Ethics. Plagiarism, in which one misrepresents ideas, words, computer codes or other creative expression as one's own, is a clear violation of such ethical principles. Plagiarism can also represent a violation of copyright law, punishable by statute.

All authors are deemed to be individually and collectively responsible for the content of papers published by The Science and Information Organization. Hence, it is the responsibility of each author to ensure that papers submitted to The SAI Organization attains the highest ethical standards with respect to plagiarism.

When plagiarism has been found to have occurred, The SAI Organization will take the actions as determined by the type of plagiarism. Unless determined otherwise during the investigation, all authors are deemed to be individually and collectively responsible for the content of a plagiarizing paper. The SAI Organization Editorial Board places the investigation of each claim of plagiarism at the highest priority for resolution and action.

See more here